A one-size-fits-all solution to sports fraud

  • Article by: KEVIN HORRIGAN , St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  • Updated: January 22, 2013 - 7:20 PM

Let's create a rogue's gallery for players whose performance was worthy but who took actions detrimental to the game's integrity.

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barbjensJan. 23, 13 7:32 AM

What was the reason the Postal Service gave him $40 million if they are not doing well financially??

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cindaleJan. 23, 13 9:10 AM

Several baseball players who used steroids are already in the Hall of Fame. Just not in the main hall with a plaque. But their accomplishments are mentioned in several other exhibits. That should be enough. Let's move on.

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owatonnabillJan. 23, 1310:11 AM

One has to wonder just what this imagined "integrity" consists of. How many more home runs would Babe Ruth have hit, for example, had he had access to the cutting-edge athletic training of 2013 instead of the rudimentary knowledge of 1927, and had eaten a diet tailored to give him a cutting-edge metabolism and body, instead of swilling burgers and beer? People can (probably will) make the argument that since none of that was available in any substantial sense in Ruth's heyday, the argument is specious--but that is looking at the thing backwards. In just about any professional sport, doping is freely available to those who care to indulge, and probably more do it than not. So why would Armstrong and many others figuratively limit themselves to the restrictions of 1927 when the dope of 2013 is so available? We can judge and moralize all we want but when big money is involved, athletes are going to do what is necessary to gain and hold an edge. Doping is a fact of professional sports today. To pretend otherwise is to be delusional.

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FrankLJan. 23, 13 1:50 PM

Looking at Armstrong we have to remember the context, the sad fact is that all the teams were doping. My guess is that if everyone had been straight, Armstrong would have still won some of the trophies. In contrast, Bonds was competing against a majority that were playing it straight, so are his achievements real? He would have been good, but my guess is just above average.

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