Investigators turn focus to Japanese maker of lithium ion batteries in grounded Boeing 787s

  • Article by: ELAINE KURTENBACH , Associated Press
  • Updated: January 21, 2013 - 6:46 PM
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onelesscarJan. 21, 1310:44 AM

Seems we've come full circle...Japanese-made products are often of lesser quality than American-made. Also, American-made cars are of better quality than Japanese. Look at all the serious recalls plagueing Toyota, Nissan etc. We have been extremely happy with our American cars and do not miss foreign ones one bit. Also happy to be helping our hurting economy.

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muggsh2oJan. 21, 1311:14 AM

Boeing decides to outsource the building of the Dreamliner. The first time in its history and look what happens. I hope the workers in Everett, Washington are screaming, "I told you so!" really loud!

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rschildkJan. 21, 1311:26 AM

These are NOT the same batteries used in Electric/Extended-range cars? The cells in the 787, from Japanese company GS Yuasa, use a cobalt oxide (CoO2) chemistry, just as mobile-phone and laptop batteries do. That chemistry has the highest energy content, but it is also the most susceptible to overheating that can produce “thermal events” (which is to say, fires). Only one electric car has been built in volume using CoO2 cells, and that’s the Tesla Roadster. Only 2,500 of those cars will ever exist. The Chevrolet Volt range-extended electric car, on the other hand, uses LG Chem prismatic cells with manganese spinel (LiMn2O4) cathodes. While chemistries based on manganese, nickel, and other metals carry less energy per volume, they are widely viewed as less susceptible to overheating and fires. So if you see coverage of the Boeing 787 battery fires that says anything at all about electric cars, do consider dropping a friendly note to the reporter involved.

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davehougJan. 21, 1311:51 AM

Nobody off-shores to increase quality.....just to lower the cost.

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