Neiman's plans earlier exit from downtown Minneapolis

  • Article by: JOHN EWOLDT , Star Tribune
  • Updated: January 15, 2013 - 11:08 PM

Upscale retailer plans to close Jan. 26, almost a week early, but much of the store is already bare.

  • 12
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
twincitizen1Jan. 15, 13 9:31 PM

At first I was bummed that downtown was losing another retailer, but I've sort of come around to the idea that department stores and downtowns are not a great fit in the first place. Downtowns need street level shops with windows that activate the streetscapes and encourage outdoor pedestrian activity. Trying to recreate suburban environments (inwardly-facing malls) in a downtown area is a recipe for disaster. I also don't think Neimann was a great fit for this market, with it's focus on ultra-luxury brands and sky-high prices. Even the trendiest high-fashion Minneapolitans have budget-conscious midwestern values embedded in their DNA. The rise in online shopping also goes without saying as another factor. There's a building boom happening in downtown Minneapolis and in less than 2 years, there will be several hundred new residents just a block away (and several thousand just a few blocks further). Here's to hoping this space can be reinvented and suited to fit the needs of local residents. As a city resident, I'd love to do more of my shopping downtown, just not necessarily in department stores.

18
8
tharaldson74Jan. 16, 13 1:06 AM

I am not sure I can agree with TwinCitizen...completely. A flagship department store like Macy's (Macy's has several flagships with all the consolidation), works well in a downtown...it is unique. Neiman was not. ...and while I prefer street side stores, Minneapolis is not Kansas City or St. Louis (empty downtowns) to some extent because of the skyway system. The key is to intregrate outside and in better. Gavidae Common is anything but a suburban mall. Architectural critic James Lileks points this out well in his blogs. Probably one of the biggest problems with that spot is that it goes no where. FOr years the city and its ridiculous building regs have prevented development of the blank blocks on the other side of Neiman. Now there is a condo going in but there is plenty of empty space yet. Most successful retailers in downtown are in spots where there is back and forth....that spot was not. You may be right about our Norther Plains values...we actually have the highest disposable income in the nation, but the northern European spend thrift may be a factor for sure.

8
0
dorkeemnJan. 16, 13 6:40 AM

I walked through there on Monday - I felt like I was trespassing - Honestly - no shoppers (very few) and a lot of employees standing around wondering if they would get full severance. I finally found some men's clothes on 1st floor and had a heart attack at the "Sale" prices... $245 for a long sleeve shirt? $175 for a pair of wool dress pants? Not in my budget...

15
1
biggusdoggusJan. 16, 13 9:43 AM

Dear twincitizen1, This whole "Downtowns need street level shops with windows that activate the streetscapes and encourage outdoor pedestrian activity" is just a red herring. Neiman's WAS street level with doors opening up to both Nicollet and 5th Street. Other street level shops with windows on Nicollet include e-Trade, Oceanaire, Caribou Coffee, Macy's Joseph A Bank, Target, D'Amico & Sons, Gap, Men's Warehouse, Panara Bread, Walgreens and Target, to name just a few. The only reason anyone makes the claim that we need street level shops with windows is so someone on the Downtown Council can give some friend $100K every couple of years to do a study. It's a racket. There are hundreds of street-level shops downtown. Hundreds.

7
1
motytrahJan. 16, 1310:38 AM

Obviously don't know how to run a store closing sale. They can be incredibly profitable if you know what you're doing. They should have brought in the last call merchandise from other stores right away. Many stores actually bring in additional merchandise for a store closing because there is a perception of value.

2
0
Fair ViewJan. 16, 1311:44 AM

Trib - how about some business news? The closure has already been announced and reported on. Pulling in the date by a week isn't headline worthy.

2
1
dtmonkeyboyJan. 16, 1312:16 PM

Fairview...reporting takes money and in case you hadn't heard media companies don't have much anymore. Welcome to the internet world, where dollars in ad revenue were turned into pennies. Even CNN closed their entire investigative Journalism depart and TV news stations are hiring more young (and cheap) reporters.

2
0
dtmonkeyboyJan. 16, 1312:19 PM

Department stores in general have not done well. Ridgdale, Southdale, Rosedale, Highland Park all last major department stores in the last 10 years --and so did the Mall of America -- and, frankly Neiman's never fit with Minnesota. You will note they did not opt to move to Gallaria or Southdale or Ridgdale or mall of America. They basically gave up on MN altogether.

5
0
rshacklefordJan. 16, 1312:44 PM

Many thought our new Peoples' Baseball Stadium and the non/underfunded Peoples' Multipurpose Stadium (to be cancelled hopefully) would attract tourists and keep us from being just a "Cold Omaha." I guess none of them were right. We are just as we know we are: an Omaha that is five to ten degrees than an already cold Omaha.

1
3
matt5mn01Jan. 16, 13 2:00 PM

Downtown Minneapolis has it's purpose. Corporate attorneys, financial planners and CPA's paint the landscape of the daily 9-5 of downtown. Shopping is more of novelty to the downtown culture. Most hardworking income producing workers are not there to shop; they are there to work. Shopping is done on the weekends when most people are wanting to spend time with their families. As a fellow coworker once said to me "Neiman Marcus is downtown?" my response was "Exactly." Poor management and branding lead to their demise. Any Neiman Marcus that I have seen is located in more affluent sections of society. Downtown Minneapolis is not one of them.

2
2

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT