Shakopee's growth spurt comes to a dead stop

  • Article by: SUSAN FEYDER and DAVID PETERSON , Star Tribune
  • Updated: January 13, 2013 - 7:18 AM

Steep city fees among reasons cited for Shakopee's stagnation.

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loosecannonJan. 13, 13 1:19 AM

I guess you can't really compare Shakopee with other outer-ring suburbs when it comes to growth patterns because the opening of the Bloomington Ferry Bridge (1997, I think?) was a major and immediate growth engine (access) that wasn't there prior. You probably had a lot of people that were speculatively buying land beforehand that didn't do as well as they'd hoped and that turned into a large supply of lots that turned into less-expensive houses. Now that the market is correcting, it'll be interesting to see where it goes.

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livefreeordJan. 13, 13 8:16 AM

You don't really have to be competitive at this point in time. Make the developers coming into the city pay for the services they require and also the new schools, police and fire stations. As a city, you don't have to have every scrap of land developed just as soon as possible. Save some open land for development opportunities in the future when it will be valuable enough to pay it's own way.

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yoppa13Jan. 13, 13 9:13 AM

I was going to build in Shakopee but the new Mayor scared me and my husband away. Just as well, there are better cheaper places to live.

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mark44Jan. 13, 13 9:50 AM

Half a billion dollars in state road construction money and Shakopee hits a wall? Apparently, the land speculators there & the city haven't faced the new reality that building on treeless former cornfields just isn't bringing 'em in like it used to. I'm guessing that a big chunk of the city budget is reliant on these huge fees they've been able to get from new developments in the past, so they'll either have to raise property taxes and/or cut the skimpy ammenities to make up for it...or say bye-bye to growth.

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west336Jan. 13, 1310:41 AM

On the flipside....for those of you who are looking for wide open spaces AND proximity to the city, look at these Shakopee lots!

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imperial67Jan. 13, 1311:14 AM

I didn't understand reasoning stating flooding as one of the causes of non-growth in Shakopee. People in Prior Lake and Savage cross the same river ,yet their cities are growing. As a 40 year Shakopee resident I believe a penny wise ,dollar foolish mentality by city officials is what is hurting growth

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justmeagainJan. 13, 13 1:32 PM

Funny, I live here and I see plenty of construction, the housing development across from the high school, on 17th, was at a standstill for completion for five years...now it's completely full. I think the mayor and council needs to stop worrying about special groups wanting to their needs and start thinking how to get growth moving again. It is not at a complete stop, the schools are still overcrowded, and growing.

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Dellman2Jan. 13, 13 7:47 PM

I think the angle on the flooding argument is the horrendous traffic backups that result for those coming into town on 169 during the weeks that 101 and 41 are closed. It is quite bad.

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hoser212Jan. 16, 13 1:06 PM

I find it interesting that the people saying that landowners are expecting too much for their land are the developers. I understand that the less they pay for their land, the more profits they can get, but when they often pay 10% of what they sell the "developed" land for to the landowner and only a few thousand per lot to the city for water/sewer fees, why should I see anything but greed for more money? If the cities want growth, they should encourage more landowners to develop their property themselves. That way both the city and the landowners profit the most and the increased property value benefits the landowners and not the greedy developers.

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venger00Jan. 22, 1410:40 PM

I am surprised that Shakopee's high per capita crime rate wasn't mentioned. The area around downtown is becoming a cess pool.

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