Skin cancer: Let's halt this rising rate

  • Article by: CHARLES E. CRUTCHFIELD III
  • Updated: January 14, 2013 - 10:17 AM

As a dermatologist, I see firsthand the devastating toll that skin cancer takes on Minnesotans.

  • 4
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
  • 1 - 4 of 4
amandaoJan. 14, 1312:32 PM

Excellent article. I think a lack of education on the dangers of tanning plays a huge role in the rising skin cancer rates as well. If I knew about the risks associated with tanning beds, I would never have used them. In my mid-twenties and have numerous pre-cancer scars, my best friends has melanoma, IN OUR 20s! Wish we would have known. We both tanned in the summer and before formal dances. ... Thank you for spreading the word Dr. Crutchfield.

3
0
guessagainJan. 14, 13 1:28 PM

As a baby boomer with skin cancer, I am amazed at the number of teens and twenty-somethings who sunbathe or use tanning beds. I grew up in the 50's and 60's and spent much of my youth outdoors (no Internet, cable TV or smartphones). We also had no sunscreen, but more ozone protecting us. Still, for the last 30 years, I see my dermatologist twice a year to avoid getting a melanoma that killed my father. Every time there is freezing, PDT, biopsies or surgery. The damage you do in your teens and twenties can haunt you for the rest of your life, or shorten your life by decades. I know now that being tan did nothing for me except to make the last 30 years an ongoing struggle with skin cancer. Don't, for a minute, think that because it is treatable that it isn't deadly. Most cancers are just that way. And tell your kids that being in the sun without lots of sunscreen can (and in many cases will) kill them. Kinda like smoking!

3
0
cstoney48Jan. 14, 13 6:51 PM

guessagain said: " I see my dermatologist twice a year to avoid getting a melanoma that killed my father. Every time there is freezing, PDT, biopsies or surgery." Amen! Tan is beautiful, until it kills you. Great article....

0
0
sunawareJan. 15, 13 5:47 PM

Thank you, Dr. Crutchfield, for your continuous efforts to educate the public about the dangers associated with exposure to the sun and artificial UVR. I wish you had been able to mention SunAWARE, an education tool for the general public used by many organizations trying to slow the epidemic of this disease - a tool you have used in your book for children. SunAWARE - five easy steps to prevent and detect skin cancer. AVOID unprotected exposure to sunlight, seek shade and never indoor tan WEAR sun-protective clothing,including a long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat, and sunglasses, year-round. APPLY broad spectrum sunscreen with a sunburn-protection factor (SPF) of 30 or greater to all exposed skin, and reapply every two hours or as needed. ROUTINELY examine your whole body for changes in your skin and report concerns to parents or health-care provides. EDUCATE your family and community about the need to be SunAWARE Parents, teachers, community programs, doctors and anyone who wants to help fight skin cancer, can learn and teach these five steps. Dr. Crutchfield uses them in his book, 'SunAWARE Hits a Home Run', written for children of all colors and for their families. The article should mention this valuable tool, and Minnesotans should be happy they have this skin cancer warrior fighting for them.

0
0
  • 1 - 4 of 4

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

  • about opinion

  • The Opinion section is produced by the Editorial Department to foster discussion about key issues. The Editorial Board represents the institutional voice of the Star Tribune and operates independently of the newsroom.

  • Submit a letter or commentary
Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT