Editorial: Bolster main streets to boost population

  • Article by: EDITORIAL BOARD , Star Tribune
  • Updated: January 7, 2013 - 7:04 AM

Penn Avenue North should get more than a facelift.

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scottkyJan. 6, 13 6:06 PM

Here's suggestion for Penn Avenue North, and not a tongue-in-cheek jest - Level the whole area and start over. Seriously. To get the growth you are advocating for, as well as the additional tax base that would come with it, it would be best to start with a totally clean slate instead of patchwork attempts for a renaissance.

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barefootpaulJan. 6, 13 7:06 PM

There is some new construction along Penn that's worth keeping including the new school north of Lowry and at the Lowry, Broadway, and Plymouth intersections (one good corner at each). The project shouldn't end at Dowling. One of the first things should be to fix the horrible intersection at 44th Ave.

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dudufooJan. 6, 13 8:44 PM

How about finding a sustainable model that does not depend on unstustaneable growth? You people obviously are not thinking of the long impact of human population growth.

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ruphinaJan. 6, 1311:37 PM

Seattle grows mostly because of the Communist government out there that prevents people living outside a line drawn by the dictators from developing their own property. Their conspiracy is aided by the mountainous landscape surrounding the area and lubed by the developers greasing the campaign funds of the communists in charge. To do the same here, we need to outlaw any new homes outside the 494-694 loop, because all you evil landowners outside that line are trying to kill the planet and make life hard for the inner city types. Bill G.

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ruphinaJan. 6, 1311:45 PM

"as younger people lean toward more urban lifestyles". Really. Ad a few years later when they want to raise a family? Where will they do that? The article starts this grand urban renewal by advocating razing single-family housing. Will these apartments be nice enough and safe enough to attract young well-educated people, or will they be built for cheap and subsidized to fill them with low-income urbanites? You can pretty much bet that if it is latter, you won't get many of the former and they will bail at the 1st opportunity. What Minneapolis needs isn't neccessarily more people but safe housing for the people. Bill G.

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garagewineJan. 7, 1312:03 AM

Denver and Portland are adding population by annexing adjacent land and expanding their boundaries. Neither place is becoming more dense.

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basia2186Jan. 7, 13 1:29 AM

I can see it now-suburban shoppers patronizing businesses with bars on the windows. Clean up the crime. Make loitering illegal, enforce the noise ordinances for motor vehicles, enact a 3 strikes and you are in jail for life law. Heck- if uber - left California can do it, why haven't we?

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wa0tdaJan. 7, 13 5:52 AM

We are in a period of great transition, since the way we work and where we work is now driven by a global economy. I am not saying that the traditional concept of an urban core with lunchbucket factory jobs and concentrated office/retail is gone for good, but sometimes I think we forget why the housing supporting this old model existed in the first place. People should live where work and transportation is convenient to be sure, but investing in this project should proceed slowly and the results tracked lest it turn out to be a costly mistake.

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west336Jan. 7, 13 8:28 AM

Re-zone most neighborhoods to allow for carriage housing (or "Granny Flats"), re-zone all primary thoroughfares (incl. Penn Ave) to be multi-family and/or mixed-use medium-high density (allowing for density along the transit routes but preserving the SFH character of much of the city), promote further density and infill in neighborhoods where it already exists, and -- while lessening restrictions on density -- create stricter height limits in areas sensitive to taller/bulkier development. Make this city easier to develop in and the population should spike. Also take care of your neighborhoods and especially viable transit corridors like Penn Ave, Lyndale, or Lowry Ave on the North Side. If the poorest and worst of our city neighborhoods are strong, the city will be strong.

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west336Jan. 7, 13 8:30 AM

garagewine: that's true (they annex) but both are certainly becoming more dense and both have much better suburban density than the Twin Cities does. They are both great models to follow in terms of sustainable development....and I've almost never heard anybody say they wouldn't live in Denver, Portland or Seattle because they're "too urban", so that tells me that there is a happy medium between density and space.

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