Testing teachers: National exam is a worthy idea

  • Article by: Editorial , Chicago Tribune
  • Updated: January 2, 2013 - 11:01 AM

Too many ill-equipped people do enter the teaching profession. That doesn't help anyone.

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okaybruceJan. 1, 13 7:23 PM

Public schools are a disaster. Close them down.

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pumiceJan. 1, 13 7:47 PM

From the article: "The best teachers are magicians. They have the capacity to inspire, to keep a young person focused, to develop the mind and, perhaps above all, to motivate." Exactly, ChiTrib editors! Tests can measure a teacher's knowledge of the subject s/he will teach. Is there a test which can measure the capacity to inspire, to keep a young person focused, to develop the mind and to motivate?

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tandabussJan. 2, 13 7:58 AM

This is an example of Randi Weingarten trying to be part of the solution. The merits of this specific idea aside, I'm glad to see her recognize that we need better ways of determining who should get to be a teacher. Kudos!

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jdlellis1Jan. 2, 13 8:05 AM

1- Perhaps I'm missing something but is not graduation from college a precursor to being a teacher? If individuals are coming out of college unprepared, then alter the curriculum to ensure the transition from student to teacher? 2 - Such legislation would probably prohibit the Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckherberg from teaching. 3 - This type of writing is what happens when people have too much time on their hand and look for a problem to match their solution.

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waterdogzJan. 2, 13 4:27 PM

I rarely come across editorials with such lack of logic. It is ironic that it's about education? In addition, what is the case law equivalent that would be tested in this "bar exam for teachers?" Try to think of the topics (outside of a specific subject-area knowledge) that would be covered on the test. What do you come up with? Generic education theory? Ridiculous and hugely expensive idea.

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alansonJan. 2, 13 8:58 PM

Will nationalization of our schools raise up the worst or drag down the best? It seems to me that Minnesota, with pretty good schools, students and teachers generally, has a lot to lose here. It's the inequality of performance that is disturbing, in good school systems and bad. Blaming the teachers is easy. But it's easy to see that the quality of the home environment is the real discriminator here. We need to focus on what works in our inner cities (and isolated rural areas) and make significant incremental investments there.

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