How to make year-end charity count

  • Article by: KEN STERN
  • Updated: December 28, 2012 - 8:24 PM

What you need to know to evaluate a charity.

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mdecock23Dec. 29, 1212:25 PM

I believe a correction is in order. The original Washington Post headline for this piece is "Five myths about charitable giving." Nowhere in this reprint does it say that the 5 points are myths or untrue, giving the article a completely different meaning.

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mstthreekDec. 29, 12 1:37 PM

This article states, "People with income in the lowest quintile give a higher percentage of their earnings to charity than do more wealthy Americans. This pattern persists despite the fact that low earners have less disposable income and rarely take advantage of itemized tax deductions for charitable donations." This is one reason I've soured on the right despite voting that way multiple times in the last 2 decades. Sorry righties but the perception is you give less in charity and pay less in taxes than the middle class and below while stating you give too much already. Attack me all you want but until you address these facts, you're in this boat. A strong middle class helps everyone and the richest country in the world should try to help each other for everyone's benefit instead of going for the immediate cash grab. The right has solid idealogies but there's a time and place for everything. Let's put on our big boy pants (all of us) and start working on this huge elephant in the room instead of whining about what our country owes us. Let's try and not totally phillips screwdriver the next generations. The generation that built us into the powerhouse we are now gave so much more to the country than we are.

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education1stDec. 29, 1211:19 PM

Ken Stern writes truly that we should all be careful about giving to supposed charitable organizations, even well-known nonprofits. Here in Minneapolis, for example, individual donors, corporations and foundations (Cargill, General Mills, Ameriprise, Best Buy, Target, Wells Fargo, United Way, McKnight, Kellogg, KAHR, Macy’s, Thrivent, Medtronic and the Minneapolis Foundations) should look into whether the local YW is operating more like a for-profit health club than a community-based organization.

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