College graduate: The demise of my dream

  • Article by: KIRSTEN HART
  • Updated: December 19, 2012 - 8:04 PM

All through high school and college, I planned to be a big-time editor. I look back at my plans now and shake my head.

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probsolverDec. 19, 1210:40 PM

But there are also many college graduates like me: young women returning home to rethink what defines success, and what it means to "have it all." ---- and thats "society's fault"? Hmmmm.

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whartDec. 19, 1211:14 PM

You missed the point by a mile.

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arielbenderDec. 19, 1211:43 PM

Maybe the author should replace her dream with another. That's what real people do.

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dvsdan123Dec. 20, 12 5:52 AM

Until you learn that expectations come from within yourself and not from society, you will never be happy with your lot in life.

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davehougDec. 20, 12 6:57 AM

More important than holding a job title that reflects my full potential is my commitment to leading a balanced life. If I were to chase my dreams to the ends of the Earth, I would not be effectively present in my personal relationships. I would not be able to raise a family without relying on others to fill in the gaps of my absence. And if I were to rearrange my career in a way that would accommodate those things, I would give up all hope of being considered for a senior editing position.- - - - - Welcome to being a 1950's Father. Those dads who never changed a diaper also sacraficed for family.....because they were the 'provider' and were not given much of a choice between career and family.

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union601Dec. 20, 12 8:27 AM

Bravo, davehoug. I don't know how it could have been said any better. Thank you!

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noahrjDec. 20, 12 9:04 AM

A very well written article that tugs at the bigger issue of defining realistic expectations -- thank you for this! As a male recent grad, I can't necessarily empathize with all the issues you're facing, but I get the larger concept of leaving the idealistic liberal arts atmosphere and crashing on the surface of terra firma's, cold, hard realism. We're taught that with our college degree and enough passion, we can still accomplish anything we want, but the vast majority of us quickly find out that's far from the truth. I don't mean to say that colleges should stop instilling shameless optimism in their students, but maybe it should fall to institutions to make graduates more cognizant of what the world is like before we're blindsided by a weak economy and a saturated job market.

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beebee82Dec. 20, 12 9:12 AM

"Welcome to being a 1950's Father. Those dads who never changed a diaper also sacraficed for family.....because they were the 'provider' and were not given much of a choice between career and family."

Seriously? Men in the 50s weren't given a choice? I think fathers who changed diapers and managed to get to work every day 60 years ago would be a little amused by this statement.

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union601Dec. 20, 12 9:20 AM

Bravo, davehoug. I don't know how it could have been said any better. Thank you!

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hermajestyDec. 20, 1210:06 AM

The "cold hard reality" is that companies stopped hiring liberal arts graduates in the 1980s. Those 1960s fathers that davehoug refers to may have majored in English or history and still have been hired for management trainee jobs. I was in academia during the transition. In the late 1970s, major corporations hired graduates in any major and trained them in-house. In the early 1980s, all of a sudden, only business or computer science majors were acceptable.

I even did informational interviews at Twin Cities companies when I was considering leaving academia (something I actually did about ten years later). I interviewed about a dozen middle managers, all of whom had been liberal arts majors (math, music, history, French), all of whom told me that their company was no longer hiring liberal arts majors. Maybe it's because liberal arts majors considered human values instead of just running roughshod over everyone and everything to achieve that magical bottom line.

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