Argument over video-game violence resurfaces after Conn. school shootings

  • Article by: LOU KESTEN , Associated Press
  • Updated: December 19, 2012 - 4:10 PM

WASHINGTON - In the days since the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., a shell-shocked nation has looked for reasons. The list of culprits cited include easy access to guns, a strained mental-health system and the "culture of violence" — the entertainment industry's embrace of violence in movies, TV shows and, especially, video games.

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clnorthDec. 19, 1212:50 PM

I don't understand how people allow their children to play games where the object is to kill other people.

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AlfredBergDec. 19, 12 3:56 PM

That's the problem they don't take the time to see what games they're playing or brutal TV show they're watching. This is a parental problem that's devastating this country, it's also why our children are dumbing down.

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nferberDec. 19, 12 4:12 PM

Wait, so what is the cause? Guns, violent TV, violent video games, religion, parenting??? It is just the new flavor of the day, every story has a new reason to blame as to why this happened. Look at the percentages (we will use 'violent' video games as an example), how many people play these games compared to the people that actually commit these heinous crimes? The correlation just isn't there. Blame these tragedies on whatever you would like to make yourself feel better about the situation, at the end of the day nothing will change. The only people that lose out are the ones that actually legally enjoy whatever you are trying to 'ban'.

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bigj111Dec. 20, 1211:59 AM

I spend more time than I should in area bars. But a few months back, a group of us noticed a very curious thing, and it relates to this current topic: we were in a small dive bar in outstate Minnesota. In the corner were a couple of 20-something's pumping quarters into the Big Buck Hunter video game. Even though they were obviously drinking, we noticed that the gentlemen in question were handling the game-piece gun as though it were a real firearm......always pointing the muzzle up or at the floor, unless shooting, handing it to one another properly, etc, etc. Just as a point of comparison, I took notice the next time I was back in my local bar in the suburbs, and noted the following: similar age and demographic playing the same game, but these clowns were laughing and carrying on, pointing and shooting at each other, dropping and slamming the game-piece gun around, etc, etc. Completely opposite behavior. Same exact game. The only conclusion I can draw is that the level of respect/knowledge/familiarity each group had for firearms (even a harmelss video game version) was the defining difference. And that difference comes from something other than the game itself.

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