More than 6,300 forfeitures in 2011

  • Article by: Star Tribune
  • Updated: December 19, 2012 - 8:23 PM
  • 11
  • Comments

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breezybobDec. 19, 1210:51 AM

So it's not that property seizures have surged, it's the requirements of reporting the confiscated property are being better enforced. Makes you wonder where that unreported property ended up.

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roymercerDec. 19, 1210:54 AM

Possessions of the citizenry represent a veritable candy store for law enforcement agencies.

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RanickDec. 19, 1211:05 AM

There are two ways of looking at this. One way, if government was unable to take citizens property to fund the agencies doing the taking, the chance of corruption would be minimized. Two, if government is allowed take your property, there is going to be some level of corruption, it's basic human nature. Case in point, the task force debacle of a few years back. I'm guessing that the vast majority of property was deservedly seized and the property owners deserved to have it taken; but odds are there were also a few that didn't deserve it. As a society we have to figure out if we are willing to accept innocent people getting a bad deal for justice to be served.

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rainbow7212Dec. 19, 1211:24 AM

basically teh police were given the right to steal from the citizens it is supposed to serve. Also this is the real reason for not letting them influence the war on cannabis. Dayton says he wants law enforcement to weight in, but they have a huge conflict of interest. Why would they want the drug war to end as they get lots of money from it through theft and federal government gifts to militarize the police.

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roymercerDec. 19, 1211:44 AM

My favorite quote from the story: 'The Hennepin County attorney's office charged no one in that case. County Attorney Mike Freeman said that one reason was that 29 former officers and employees declined to be interviewed.'

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lmcgrathDec. 19, 12 1:24 PM

Mr. Ranick presents a false choice between funding and corruption. It is legislature's responsibility to fund law enforcement from the general fund consistent with the public's priorities and demand for such services. At the same time, corruption can be ended/avoided by (a) requiring a conviction in criminal court as a prequisite to the loss of the owner's property through forfeiture in civil court and (b) depositing the proceeds from the sale of seized property into the state's general fund instead of proceeds going to supplement the budgets of the police agencies and prosecutors offices that seize and forfeit property as it is done under current law. It is not difficult process to imgagine or implement, as Maine, Vermont and North Carolina have.

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member11Dec. 19, 12 1:41 PM

In a capitalist democracy money is always a strong motive. Says a lot about what types of activity law enforcement chooses to direct their attentions to and conduct investigations upon. Not always what best serves the public interest, unfortunately.

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richieswensonDec. 19, 12 1:50 PM

Bought a sheriff's auction car once and had THE WORST time trying to get the sheriff to provide title! They whined and protested like little children and it took nearly a year of badgering before I shamed them into providing it. They complained about it being "not worth the trouble" and I thought perhaps they shouldn't go around taking people's stuff then.

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ghouliemooDec. 19, 12 2:20 PM

Next thing they'll be kicking your doors in and confiscating your weapons and ammo under Joe Biden's orders.

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wolftracksDec. 19, 12 3:07 PM

My son-in-law is a deputy sheriff and is an honorable man. He puts his life on the line every time he puts on his uniform for about $48,000 per year and I guarantee you he does everything by the book. I am sure there are some cops who take advantage but majority of them serve and protect. Let's just hope you never need his services.

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