Rosenblum: Good grief! Get over a death in 2 months? They can't be serious

  • Article by: GAIL ROSENBLUM , Star Tribune
  • Updated: December 12, 2012 - 11:09 PM
  • 8
  • Comments

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  • 1 - 8 of 8
ade2309Dec. 12, 12 9:51 PM

Be careful when seeking treatment for bereavement issues. My husband was denied long term disability insurance because of past treatment for depression. How many people will be denied now just because they were grieving but it's now considered a disorder?

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efrik1Dec. 13, 1210:17 AM

I lost my son when he was 16 five years ago. I was in fog for six months and became somewhat "normal" after a year. I learned I couldn't constantly have him on my mind. While never forgetting him, I had to take those memories and put them in a box in a safe place so I could move on.

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regionguyDec. 13, 1212:15 PM

Good psychiatrists, psychologists, and therapists can work around this issue, and as the article points out, there has been tremendous controversy within the psychiatric community about this. People need to grieve at their own pace and in their own way, but sometimes we can get "stuck" and need a little help with the processing (and the effects of grief on function).

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ekelazDec. 13, 1212:29 PM

Thank you for comments on this report. I have been grieving the loss of my wife to cancer for over a year, it is just starting to become tolerable.

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rambler89Dec. 13, 1212:39 PM

More money for psychiatrists for unnecessary treatment. More groundwork for profitable treatment without consent of the patient, up to and including hospitalization--perhaps in consequence of inquiries to "caregivers" by well-meaning relatives. Keep it in the family. (PS: My mother died three months ago.) When are we going to recognize that there's no science here?

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SammyBoyDec. 13, 12 1:12 PM

One thing everyone needs to keep in mind is that most people don't visit a psychiatrist just because someone dear to them passed away. If that was the case, you could say this was a dangerous reduction in the "acceptable" grieving time. The reality, though, is that people wouldn't visit a psychiatrist for diagnosis until friends and family begin to note that there was something deeper going on, or the person themselves felt there was something wrong. So, while it seems like it's going too far, one also has to take into consideration that it's only those who think or fear that their grief has become abnormal who even be going through the the diagnosis process. The only exception I could see to this is someone who is already in treatment for some other disorder, at which point the already-developed doctor-patient relationship would trump the diagnostic manual.

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Guppy35Dec. 13, 12 9:09 PM

A bit over seven years out from losing two of my kids. I don't know that I'd ever describe life as normal again. It does get to where you learn to live with it and enjoy the life you have. Each person grieves differently and at a different speed if that's the right word.

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ranger78Dec. 14, 1211:46 AM

The APA is, like much of psychology/psychiatry modern day quackery.

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