Minnesota is a step ahead on early voting

  • Article by: KENT KAISER
  • Updated: December 4, 2012 - 7:19 PM

One small tweak to the state's absentee system is a better solution.

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obamafone4meDec. 4, 12 7:31 PM

Why not have perpetual voting? Obama perfected perpetual campaigning by running for president as a state senator in Illinois before becoming a part time US Senator where he continued the campaign. As president he campaigned for the entire 4 years and is continuing it in his second term.

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JudelingDec. 5, 12 3:38 AM

Change their minds? That was the only semi-valid reason given. Campaigns are already adjusting to the fact of early voting so the October surprises are occurring much earlier. Next we are given to assume that absentee voting is somehow less prone to fraud and abuse then in person voting. If I remember the rather extensive and public exposure of our entire voting system just four years ago this was not the case. Our elections have almost no fraud and what little fraud we actually observed was through the absentee ballot. A limited early voting system would only enhance our best in the nation participation and our stellar election system.

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merkinDec. 5, 12 7:18 AM

Someone still sounds a little sore about the election results...

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jimdogDec. 5, 12 9:25 AM

This commentator states that absentee voters may change their minds and re-vote. How many people do this?? My guess is most people are not even aware you may do this. I have never heard of it. I went to the MN Secretary of State website, under absentee voting, and it said nothing about re-voting. Do you somehow request your absentee ballot be returned and send in a new one? That sounds like it may be more susceptable to fraud than other things the commentator mentions.

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ericgus55Dec. 5, 12 9:35 AM

Let's be honest here. In-person early voting would be a better system than absentee balloting IF the goal is election integrity. The main (or only) reason that GOP supporters are for absentee balloting and against early in-person voting is that the numbers show that traditional absentee balloting tends to support Republicans and early in-person voting tends to support Democrats. As for the "running total" being publicized and suppressing the vote, why not just keep it confidential? If voters want to be able to "change their mind" about their votes, then they have the option of election day voting, or voting closer to it (nothing forces anyone to vote two weeks early rather than two days). As Judeling has already pointed out, the provable instances of false-identity voter fraud are mostly from the absentee ballots, so there must be a reason that the supporters of ID requirements (supposedly to limit fraud) are so supportive of the balloting system which actually produces the most fraud. If the goal is to limit fraud, in-person early voting is far preferable to absentee balloting. If the goal is to tilt the playing field towards the GOP, then leaving the absentee system mostly as-is while arguing against in-person early voting is the way to go.

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ericgus55Dec. 5, 12 9:46 AM

jimdog-- I have voted absentee and was never aware of the option of changing my vote, either. I agree that it sounds much more susceptible to fraud than in-person early voting. I'm curious (to the author or those of like mind) as to what would stop us from allowing in-person early voters to change their votes in-person, too? That would seem a lot simpler, safer, and more reliable in-person than through the mail.

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jgmanciniDec. 5, 12 9:48 AM

Well, if you think you might change your mind, then maybe early voting isn't for you. Most of us know which way we're going to vote pretty early on and we wouldn't have regrets about the way we voted. And we would like early voting. But, for me, the best reason for early voting is that times have changed. Most people are at work on a Tuesday. People are going in to work earlier and staying later. Early voting makes it easier for working people to vote. And since Republicans think that they are the only people who go to work, shouldn't they be all for this?

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EleanoreDec. 5, 1210:49 AM

"Consequently, a superior legislative reform would be simply to change the law to allow absentee voting without an excuse. This small tweak to the current absentee ballot system would increase voters' right to ballot access and preserve their right to election integrity." - Excellent article, common sense solution. Now couple this with mandatory voting, including a none of the above catagory for every contest wherein the winner must have a majority of the votes cast, and you've got a more open and representative system.

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EleanoreDec. 5, 1210:59 AM

Allow that absentee in person and you've got everything the liberals are asking for...which is how absentee works now if you show up at your local court house to pick up an absentee ballot.

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muggsh2oDec. 5, 1211:40 AM

Well, if you think you might change your mind, then maybe early voting isn't for you. Most of us know which way we're going to vote pretty early on and we wouldn't have regrets about the way we voted. And we would like early voting. But, for me, the best reason for early voting is that times have changed. Most people are at work on a Tuesday. People are going in to work earlier and staying later. Early voting makes it easier for working people to vote. And since Republicans think that they are the only people who go to work, shouldn't they be all for this? =================== "most of us know which way we're going to vote pretty early on". No mancini - just you partisan hacks. Many of us independents study the clowns down to the wire. Take Benghazi. If the media didn't assist the current administration with the coverup of that event, the timing should of sunk Obama. Problem number 2 - Mark Ritchie cannot be trusted. Ritchie takes his financing from the George Soros' Secretary of State Project and that financing has an agenda tied to it. All you liberals whined and cried about photo ids, but now that you have power you're conniving as much as the GOP. Let's look at what is in the best interest of uniting our state and country instead of the continuous division.

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