With spam, it's better not to give or receive

  • Article by: STEVE ALEXANDER , Star Tribune
  • Updated: December 4, 2012 - 4:19 PM
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callmeronDec. 5, 12 7:26 PM

"In addition, my incoming e-mail contains several notices of undeliverable e-mails that I didn't send that are addressed to people I don't know." I get those to my Yahoo and Gmail accounts. Anybody can spoof a sender's email address. You could specify my email address in the email header so it appears that I sent it when I did not. Spammers do this all the time and it does not mean your computer has been hacked.

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xorcistDec. 6, 12 2:07 PM

It's hard to find out who actually sent spam, because originating e-mail addresses are easy to fake.

While it may be hard to find out who sent the spam, it's not hard to find out where it came from; that is, the network where it originated. That information cannot be spoofed.

In addition to malware infecting their network, open proxies and open relays are the gateways that allow spammers to send millions of spam messages, so ISPs and network administrators have a vested interest in closing those gateways. But if you don't tell them their network is being abused in this way, they can't do anything to stop it.

To trace the source of spamm and report it to network administrators, you should sign up for a free SpamCop.net account and submit any spam message you get to them. Their systems trace the source and then let you report it to the networks involved anonymously, free of charge. There are relatively few that they cannot trace.

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