Help for overscheduled teens?

  • Article by: AIMÉE BLANCHETTE , Star Tribune
  • Updated: November 29, 2012 - 3:25 PM

Between school, sports and part-time jobs, many of today's teenagers have schedules that leave little breathing room. Some schools are trying to ease the pressure without sacrificing students' competitive edge.

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kdawg1959Nov. 28, 12 8:16 PM

Really!! I worked at a bakery 20 hrs per week, went in at midnight...went to school, played: Football, basketball and Golf (starter and lettered in all). Graduated from college (worked 30 hrs per week and full-time student) and run a business!! Earnings per yr $150k!! Unable to handle the pressure, back it off......

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bdaniel367Nov. 29, 12 6:09 AM

I'd be curious what the article would be like in less affluent districts where there are different stressers - like where am I going to sleep tonight? will I have a home when I leave school? will I have food tonight for dinner? will I be beat when I go home? These are some of the issues facing my students, not being over scheduled.

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krummschmidtNov. 29, 12 7:09 AM

As a parent in this district, I applaud Chanhassen High School's principal Tim Dorway. He seems to be both reading the factual data on teens and anxiety and listening to his students. This school ranks well both state wide and nationally. It is my understanding that the focus is on creating balance, something that most of us adults clearly lack. The philosophy of educating the "whole child" rather than teaching to the standardized test is a path I fully support and admire. Certainly, many adults have experienced the grind of being over-worked and under high-pressure...how many can sustain that pace? Asking our kids to do it for years on end is only robbing them of their happiness and youth. I'm convinced, one night a week spent together as a family will change everyone in the family for the better. Well adjusted kids make well adjusted, able learners. Nice work, Chanhassen High School!

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nimrod888Nov. 29, 12 7:15 AM

Posted by kdawg:Really!! I worked at a bakery 20 hrs per week, went in at midnight...went to school, played: Football, basketball and Golf (starter and lettered in all). Graduated from college (worked 30 hrs per week and full-time student) and run a business!! Earnings per yr $150k!! Unable to handle the pressure, back it off.....................Mine is a similar story, the only difference is I played baseball vs. golf. I now own my own company and am hated by 51% of American's because I am "rich". Maybe I am "rich" because of my work ethic and ability to do all these things without complaining that "life is too hard". Suck it up kids, you need to pay for a $20 trillion deficit, which will require lots of overtime.

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west336Nov. 29, 12 7:57 AM

My advice to younger adults is to avoid burning out at all costs. Once you burn out it's VERY hard to recover! Stay competitive but don't create undue stress unto yourselves, it's really not worth it, in my experience.

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west336Nov. 29, 12 8:01 AM

bdaniel367: Agreed....there are so many other "life stressors" that not everyone gets at the same time (or at all) that to overwork yourself when you're young may create a burn-out situation once you get older and have even MORE responsibilities (spouse, children, health, death, job, etc.). Unfortunately, it never seems to get easier, and a good work-life balance is absolutely vital to your well-being! Even major corporations stress a good work-life balance because they understand it fosters better productivity. If you aren't making $150K by the time you graduate with your own business like kdawg1959 you are NOT a failure.....go at your own pace and be your own individual!!

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jenwithrowNov. 29, 12 8:24 AM

I think the point is that, kids are DYING trying to do too much. Why not do SOMETHING to try and be proactive. Schools are a place that can do things to promote overall health, including mental health. Our society expects that everyone is cut out to be an overachiever, not the case. Just because you are rich and not affected by stress doesn't mean everyone is has that. Some people are just trying to pull themselves up by their bootstraps. Until you walk in someone elses shoes, do not judge them. I seriously doubt that implementing some strategies to help students cope is a bad thing. It is unfortunate that some still have the attitude that kids need to just "man up".

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alagnakNov. 29, 12 8:55 AM

To nimrod888- You may be 'rich', but are you happy? Is there a balance there? Do you live to work or work to live? This is just me but when I die, I don't want my legacy to be that I worked 12+ hours a day and was rich. I want a balance there of being a good family man and working hard to support them but the list goes on (fun, relaxation, relationships, giving, etc. For me being 'rich' does not equal success or happyness in my life. Again, that's just me. Kids need to develope a passion for what THEY want to get up in the morning to do for a career and to be balanced and happy. Taking time to take a breath and reflect is very important in that age too.

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gjacobNov. 29, 12 9:11 AM

School needs to come first. Too many parents have their kids in a million activities, somewhere to be every night. It's not healthy.

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dahutysNov. 29, 1210:17 AM

@nimrod888: I'd just like to point out the possibility that maybe people don't dislike you because you've got more money than them. There's just a small chance that they dislike you because you lecture them about how you're superior to them. Just some food for thought.

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