Stop crying over wolf hunt

  • Article by: EDITORIAL BOARD , Wisconsin State Journal
  • Updated: November 27, 2012 - 11:00 AM

Those opposed to Wisconsin's new hunt were wrong, says the Wisconsin State Journal's editorial board.

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farkelsteinNov. 27, 1212:04 PM

the comment that trapping wolves is easier is not really true. the average joe could probably never trap a wolf. you need the skill that comes with years of trapping, i.e. coyotes, fox or other fur bearers.

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GalinhanNov. 27, 1212:51 PM

Indicating the trapped wolf was quickly shot is supposed to make it all better? How long did the wolf endure the pain and panic before the hunter decided to check his trap? How many more were killed and never reported? Are taxidermists required to see their license and inspection verification prior to performing their service?

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dirtydogsNov. 27, 12 2:25 PM

Trapping should be outlawed...PERIOD. That is not hunting and a true hunter would agree. A sissies way to take an animal.

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SorghastrumNov. 27, 12 2:59 PM

Perhaps hunting needs to be discontinued as a cruel and unnecessary sport. Ecologically wouldn't be better to cull the human species first?

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metaltesterNov. 27, 12 4:17 PM

Well for one thing, it is good to get the Wolf population afraid of people again...it keeps them away form people camping and farms etc.

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woodbuckNov. 27, 12 5:22 PM

If the whole idea about the wolf hunt, is to make them fear human contact, why not use rubber bullets, how can anyone explain to me how a dead wolf learns anything?

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paulTandbergNov. 27, 12 7:10 PM

Bold (dumb) wolves that don't avoid man are easier to shoot (and get shot more often) than cautious (smart) wolves that avoid man. The cautious wolf that avoids man (and man's homes, pets, and livestock) lives and breeds and can lead their pups and pack down survival's road. The bold wolf that doesn't fear or respect the smell of man ends up as a rug.

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gobigblueNov. 27, 12 8:59 PM

I'm a hunter, I love it actually, but I have a hard time with the wolf hunt, both here and in my birthplace Wisconsin. Its not the concept of control through hunting, I get and accept that. The problem I have is in talking with my fellow hunters, (mainly deer, but others as well) about their utter and complete hatred of wolves,for emotional, non scientifically sound reasoning. I realize this is a broad brush, but I can honestly say I don't get that reaction to any other topic regarding outdoors regulation, not tribal rights, not fish regs, not land use. Its truly mind boggling how much people who I would otherwise consider responsible sportsmen get bent out of shape over this issue and resort to lines like "shoot em in the guts so they run" or "shoot and shut up" when speaking about wolves. Its this attitude that really gives me pause, considering that the wolf seasons WILL make killing wolves illegally that much more easy, and perhaps even more accepted, and that the enforcement budgets and staff levels are chronically low in both states. I know that there are many responsible sportsmen that really don't want to see wolves extirpated again, but I fear that it will only take a very small minority of those that do, very intensely, to make it a reality again. I don't have any solutions, I really hope the DNR in both states keep a very firm grip on the reins for both hunts (a tough proposition in WI given the choke collar of the Walker administration) because the public relation nightmare another wolf extinction would cause might doom both agencies to irrelevancy, and put all their other good work at risk.

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owatonnabillNov. 28, 12 2:07 PM

"...because the public relation nightmare another wolf extinction would cause might doom both agencies to irrelevancy..." ................... ANOTHER "extinction"? Lessee--the HandyDandy Online Dictionary defines "extinct" as "no longer in existence; that has ended or died out: an extinct species of fish.". In other words, an "extinct" species is just that. Gone. Kaput. History. The Timberwolf is certainly not that. The species flourishes in most parts of Canada as well in many Northern U.S. states. Their numbers may fluctuate but the species itself is in absolutely no danger of "extinction".

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