6 meetings planned in Minn. to talk about the environment

  • Article by: JOSEPHINE MARCOTTY , Star Tribune
  • Updated: November 26, 2012 - 6:25 AM

Six gatherings on the environment will be held in the state as regulators seek input from citizens on ways to make improvements.

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fonzi3Nov. 26, 1212:27 AM

It's about time. Smart companies and individuals know that sustainable business practices are not just a trend.

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EleanoreNov. 26, 12 7:21 AM

I ho[e everyone notes that Minnesotans are paying attention to these interactions. recent history has shown a disturbing trend, where minnesotans throughout the state speak very solidly for one course of action, then government officials take the opposite course citing minority views. The Vikings stadium and the wolf hunting season are two prominent examples. Should this be wondowdressing on corporate profitability advancement changes which actually degrade our environment, people will speak out after those decisions are made and no amount of "public" heranings will change the outcome.

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jackpinesavNov. 26, 12 8:31 AM

AIS has to be on the agenda, now. If eurasian milfoil clogs our lakes, and zebra mussels destroy water quality and fishing habitat, the recreation industry, and small town economies, is dead. Try that on for economic impact. Mille Lacs and Minnetonka are already classic examples. Science, education, $$$$, a change in attitudes will all be needed. Long overdue when progressive Arne Carlson was last governor supporting this issue.

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webfootNov. 26, 12 8:42 AM

@Eleanore: I agree. People of this state need to start paying attention and make their voices heard. We can't keep destroying our environment and habitat in the name of PROFIT.

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EleanoreNov. 26, 12 8:49 AM

Having public input sessions means worse than nothing if public input is not actually considered and acted on.

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elmore1Nov. 26, 12 9:28 AM

Eleanore, I agree with you. Our politicians have been suppressing public input on a number of important issues. I would add mining in NE MN to your list. It was brought up, Dayton "fast-tracked" the process and boom it was in. Our politicians "talk the talk" but that is about it.

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timandtiaNov. 26, 1210:12 AM

With most of the land in private hands, it is almost impossible to change things. Trust me, most of the landowners do not want to change the way they are using the land, for example farmers. Farmers want to plant crops from fenceline to fenceline using as much fertilizer as possible (which mostly runoffs into wetlands, rivers, lakes, etc.) Until the government takes back this land (which never will happen) this land will be used in any possible way. This is sad. And yes, I am a son of a former farmer, but wish I could save all the land, water, air, etec.

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EleanoreNov. 26, 1210:22 AM

" I would add mining in NE MN to your list. It was brought up, Dayton "fast-tracked" the process and boom it was in. Our politicians "talk the talk" but that is about it." - Couldn't agree more. I heard that a new look was being taken at wild rice quality based on the fact that our current 1973 regs are based on 1940s science. Sounds great, but what is the likelyhood that regulations as stringent as todays will be proposed going forward? Let's see who's represented on the comittiee studying the question.

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lettem01Nov. 26, 1210:24 AM

Didn't we pass the Legacy Amendment to address the issues noted in this article.

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arspartzNov. 26, 1210:51 AM

Will there be any discussion of the economic costs of these green regulations? Somehow I doubt it.

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