Innovation and progress hasn't died

  • Article by: JON AUSTIN
  • Updated: November 19, 2012 - 6:54 PM

The changes we've seen in computing power and connectivity are truly significant.

  • 5
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
  • 1 - 5 of 5
FrankLNov. 20, 1210:54 AM

The reason Tice thinks we've plateaued is that most of the significant development is going behind the scenes. As this article states we are building the infrastructure for a new future. Concurrent with this technology is the changing attitudes about sharing information. Companies are still afraid to let employees access information, hoarding it into little fiefdoms that waste time and money doing our job. This breeds inefficiency and redundancy. Think of it this way: at the beginning of the internet we used to have store the addresses of hundreds of favorite sites, wasting memory and creating clutter. Now, except for a few specialized sites, I just Google it and get directed to the proper location. Further, now I can use any computer in the world, and do the same thing, I am not tied to my own computer. Think if you could do your job the same way, what would the future be like?

3
0
traderbillNov. 20, 1211:54 AM

Tice didn't say there won't be progress, just that it won't be of the magnitude of the last 100 or so years and he is right. The computer is a wonderful invention...but can you say the same of the internet? It is Pandora's Box...why else are the sites most visited porn sites. Is social networking such a good thing? People put far too much information on their profiles and worse, they have forgotten how to communicate...you know, talk. That is why they love noisy restaurants and sit there texting one another. We, the baby boomers were the 'me' generation. Now we are seeing the 'I don't care about anyone else but ME generation. Think long and hard on this as your answer is far too simplified.

0
3
davehougNov. 20, 1212:58 PM

The net and advances in medicine are great. But they don't have the IMPACT of walking into a room and flooding it with light thru a switch versus carrying a lantern. The next fancy car just doesn't have the IMPACT of heading out immediately in a model T versus harnessing up the horse & buggy. No matter what the screen in front of me says now or in the future, it won't have the IMPACT of the 'machine age'. - - - davehoug@comcast.net

1
1
timuellerNov. 20, 12 1:20 PM

I'm all for optimism, but his comment about downloading 3500 DVDs while I read a sentance is incredibly far off the mark. The fastest network in my reach is cable at about 20Mbs which is about .0005 DVDs/second not the 3500/10 seconds or so he implies.

0
1
gandalf48Nov. 20, 12 2:37 PM

The real issue is the size of today's inventions are getting smaller and therefor less obvious to the average person. Just think about the millions of lines of code available at a finger tip on your tablet or phone. Even a decade ago that would have been impressive to have access to so many apps on a mobile device. The big discoveries will continue to happen in the small scope since the larger, more obvious laws of physics have already been discovered and exploited. Medicine is changing rapidly and our understanding of genetics will lead to cures for many cancers, viruses and other diseases. Things will become more efficient...smaller transistors means more powerful electronic devices in every aspect of our lives along with billions of lines of code in these devices to improve efficiency and effectiveness. Of course we won't be reinventing things like the aircraft or car but we will be making them more efficient, using different fuel sources and materials to make each newer model longer lasting and easier to use. Just think they're working on self-driving cars right now, within 10 years they will be come the norm!

2
0
  • 1 - 5 of 5

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

  • about opinion

  • The Opinion section is produced by the Editorial Department to foster discussion about key issues. The Editorial Board represents the institutional voice of the Star Tribune and operates independently of the newsroom.

  • Submit a letter or commentary
Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT