A promising result: Voters came around on photo ID

  • Article
  • Updated: November 12, 2012 - 6:00 PM
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  • 1 - 7 of 7
gandalf48Nov. 12, 12 9:59 PM

Of course, no mention of the outright lies used by the anti-Voter ID campaign. Military IDs are "government-issued photographic identification" and are appropriate as per the Voter ID amendment. Yes, the Democrat sheep voted the way their masters asked them to and many others were tricked by a dishonest campaign...I wouldn't be so proud of that.

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lizardguyNov. 13, 12 8:08 AM

They bought a bunch of lies...

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twspt7Nov. 13, 12 8:56 AM

The idea of voter ID remains popular, although it is not nearly as popular now as when it the idea was first put on the ballot as an amendment. The method in which voter ID was brought to the people did not pass the smell test, however. It was all one side pushing for it, and it made regular folks wonder about the true motivation of those behind the amendment effort. Further, the process, if enacted, was not spelled out in the amendment, kicking the can down the road for the next legislature to deal with. All in all, a rather cynical effort by the GOP to run an end around the legislative process and get out the core vote.

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bereasonableNov. 13, 12 9:22 AM

The voters used reason instead of fear to cast their ballots. They understood that the Constitution didn't need to be sullied by an amendment proposed by a bunch of fear-mongers talking about cheating in order to suppress the vote. Minnesotans are reasonable people after all.

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traderbillNov. 13, 12 9:39 AM

Poor lori, it didn't take long for the 'flamers' to attack. Perhaps now we can see the need for a constitutional amendment: not on voting or marriage, but to raise the amount needed for passage to two-thirds. Look how close we came to allowing two, arguably un-constitutional laws to become a blemish on our state constitution. Didn't Prohibition seem like a good idea at the time? Yet it tranformed law-abiding citizens into criminals and made crime profitable. Think anytime you vote on any law or amendment. Poor Colorado and Washington. The strength of the conservative vote will make their marijuana laws moot. While we spend billions on enforcement and lose all that revenue.

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kindaliberalNov. 13, 1210:39 AM

The two amendments failed because the arguments in their favor were ultimately rejected. The marriage amendment had no persuasive yes argument, just a religious belief. People will usually reject someone else pushing their religion on them. The Voter ID proponents failed to show any persuasive evidence of voter fraud. Absent that, voters merely saw a more complicated electoral process designed to make it harder to vote, not to prevent fraud. Voters are starting to learn, the more you examine teaparty style proposals the less you like them and the less sense they make.

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chuckdancerNov. 13, 12 5:22 PM

We don't need an ammendment to correct any systemic problems with our electoral process and Minnesotans knew that.

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