Now what for the GOP? Appreciate an evolving nation

  • Article by: MICHAEL GERSON
  • Updated: November 9, 2012 - 5:36 PM

As a matter of strategy, it is generally not a good idea to express disdain for an electorate one hopes to eventually influence.

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pumiceNov. 9, 12 7:48 PM

From the article: "{Edmund Burke] saw social change as a constant. The goal was to ease a nation's way through change while retaining what is strongest in its traditions. Burke insisted that the present was better than the past, and that the future could be better still if change were grounded in a society's basic character. And he believed that politics had to suit a society's real circumstances, not an idealized version of them." That social change is a constant in our nation has been demonstrated by the inexorable march toward full civil and human rights for women and for minorities. For almost two full centuries, that march made the present better than the past. The future can be better still if change continues to be grounded in our basic character: "Everyone gets a fair shot, everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same set of rules." As to the real circumstances faced by our society, our political leaders must work together to build a future in which demand for goods and services fuels the economic engine which will recreate the largest, most prosperous middle class small businesspeople, professionals, and workers in the history of the world.

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okbruceNov. 9, 12 9:01 PM

Liberals are not interested in cooperation, "working together," or compromise. There is no middle ground here. There will always be a fight.

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Jakein08Nov. 10, 12 6:08 AM

Trying to block minorities from voting is not a good starting point! I believe that the GOP has given the latino vote to the DFL for the next generation. People do not soon forget when you try to disinfranchise them. Look what is happening in Arizona. 600,000 uncounted provisional ballots, many from the latino community, and these are U.S citizens,by the way.

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rangesonNov. 10, 12 7:12 AM

What's missing here? The fact that letting the same people just change their talking points will NOT work. Get rid of Rove, Rush, Beck, and Fox news, or you will never change, GOP. Goodbye.

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alaskanredNov. 10, 12 8:56 AM

"He lacked a public philosophy that explained government's valid role in meeting human needs. Suburban women heard little about improved public education. Single women, particularly single mothers, heard little about their struggles -- apart from an off-putting Republican critique of food stamps. Blue-collar workers in, say, Ohio heard little about the unique challenges of declining industrial communities. Latinos heard little from Republicans about promoting equal opportunity and economic mobility."******** What you fail to acknowledge is that you put up a bad candidate. Maybe these diverse groups aren't blinded by skin color and saw that Romney wasn't saying anything of value. Yet, I've read so many comments about how black people especially are racist for there overwhelming support of the President, but did you notice something here... In this "we have to become a bigger tent" speech black people were excluded as were others such as gays and Asians.

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cks1950Nov. 10, 12 9:24 AM

Once again an article trying to claim that black is white & up is down. The "evolving" nation" that the author seems to be writing about needs to vote less from a perspective of their race, holding accountable those of their own race for his/her job performance, and not blindly marking the ballot to "have someone's back". Should the "evolving nation" ever get to that point, only then will the GOP message start to make sense to them.

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annsypNov. 10, 12 9:50 AM

A big part of GOP campaign strategy this time around was energizing the base vote by demonizing whole groups of Americans, typified by Romney's infamous "47% video." Who were these groups? Immigrants, particularly Latinos, anyone who believed in climate change, anyone who took public transportation, union members, gays, anyone who ever got any government assistance, the highly educationed, women who don't want to be at the mercy of constant childbearing, African Americans, public employees. These people, it was clear, would get what was coming to them if Romney was elected. Turns out, those groups didn't much like being demonized and came out in large numbers to defeat Romney/Ryan. The mystery is why the GOP thought this was a winning strategy in the first place.

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annsypNov. 10, 1210:55 AM

Correction to my previous post: should read "highly educated", not "highly educationed." I do know better!

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crystalbayNov. 10, 12 2:15 PM

Looking for non-white faces in any of Romney's large rally crowds was like "looking for Waldo". In less than three decades, whites will be the minority demographic. I guess the 1 billion dollars, Citizen's United, the GOP-defeated campaign disclosure bill, voter-suppression, and the 24/7 propaganda machine called FOX altogether just couldn't fleece or fool the majority of Americans into voting for the most inauthentic, unfit, and disingenuous candidate ever fronted by the GOP? My belief in American goodness and rationality has never been higher after this election.

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oat777Nov. 10, 12 2:51 PM

I am an independant who has a level of distain for both parties. This time around there was a lot more for the GOP. They are standing in the way of progress and refuse to bend thier idiology at all to get anything done. The "conservatism" they have been asking for would require a time machine. Davis & Emmer were rambling on the day after the election about how they missed the way society was back in the 50's. Huh? What? You mean when gays didn't exist? (They did, just couldn't tell anyone for fear of thier own safety) Or when the Cleaver's lived next door? (They didn't, you just never saw dad drunk beating on mom and the kids.) Society only moves forward not back. Just like the Catholic church, either evolve with the rest of us or get out of the way!

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