Voters share blame for negative campaigns

  • Article by: MARTIN SCHRAM , Scripps Howard News Service
  • Updated: November 7, 2012 - 12:56 AM

Too many of us prefer to get what we call news from blogs, Tweets and cable news channels that pander to partisans to get ratings.

  • 12
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
Guppy35Nov. 6, 12 8:09 PM

I'm not sure how it becomes my fault if the folks spewing information at me 24 hours a day do anything to try and get me to listen. My integrity isn't at stake here. And there is no profit for me in the lies and distortions. Outside of totally turning off everything and not paying any attention at all, I'm stuck trying to make sense of all the BS that's shoveled at me. Again, I don't know how that becomes my fault? I'm not selling advertising or trying to get me to watch a particular channel or read a particular website or paper.

13
4
garagewineNov. 6, 12 8:47 PM

I'm sure reputable organizations like Scripps Howard News Service have nothing to do with this phenomena.

5
7
sjhuotNov. 6, 12 8:50 PM

It is our fault primarily because if we are in favor of the candidate who lies and relies almost exclusively on negative advertising, we tolerate it. DJ Tice wrote a very illuminating editorial in the SPPP more than twenty years ago that I have taken to heart. He remarked that George Bush, Sr. and the Republicans insisted that Clarence Thomas's nomination to replace Thurgood Marshall had nothing to do with his race, and people accepted that as if it were true. We tend to excuse lies and half-truths told by those we are politically aligned with, and we hope they will get away with it. In the meantime, we scream like wounded banshees when the opposition lies. Until we hold our own people accountable for their lies, we will remain polarized and at the mercy of the liars.

8
2
comradeNov. 6, 12 9:14 PM

Journalism as a profession is in total disrepute, and deservedly so. It is laughable that Mr. Schram wants to blame us, the powerless, for the bias, lies and half truths turned out by professional journalists on a daily basis. When you can't trust any of the major, corporate owned networks and the big newspapers, who enjoy a monopoly in their towns, don't blame people who are simply sick of the B.S. and turn to any source other than the media giants to get their information.

10
4
jdlellis1Nov. 6, 12 9:37 PM

In summary the problems with the masses are. 1 - The desire for depth has been replaced by instant. 2 - The search solely to reinforce one's own belief. 3 - Sophomoric name calling and labels (e.g. generalities) 4 - The search for cool (pop culture) as opposed to substance. In other words, what is noble about aspiring politicians to be rock stars. Do we really want Lohen, Fity Cent, Sheen to be leaders? 5 - The inability to take the high ground (e.g., Ghandi, King, Mother Theresa, Pope John Paul) by living with the creed "Seek first to understand then to be understood" - Covey.

4
2
pumiceNov. 6, 1210:35 PM

Re: "Candidates will never stop lying, distorting or deceiving until we all do our jobs -- and make sure they pay a penalty when they try to con their way to victory." I submit that that is exactly what happened today. Also, I submit that--just as we ordinary citizens forced Members of Congress to prohibit themselves from flagrant insider trading--our next goal should be to force Members of Congress to convert Big Bucks campaigns to Publicly Financed campaigns. We should also demand that our elected representatives do the job which we hire them to do: Work together in the best interest of the common good and in the best interests of our nation. Job One--create an economic environment which gets our unemployed and underemployed workers back to work at jobs which pay a living wage. That will create demand which encourages small businesspeople to expand existing small businesses or to start up new small businesses. Job Two--encourage our Government to provide for the common good, specifically by reforming Medicare and Social Security and by making wellness care affordable, effective and universal.

5
2
jdlellis1Nov. 7, 1212:00 AM

pumice, Regretfully tomorrow what will be important is not much of what you have outlined but "Dancing With the Stars," football on Sunday's and the opening of the new James Bond movie. All of which do little to impact our lives other than entertain while those things which do impact our lives in Congress and the State Legislater take a back seat.

5
1
luzhishenNov. 7, 12 6:51 AM

"According to a Wesleyan Media Project study, 86 percent of President Barack Obama's ads and 79 percent of Mitt Romney's ads were negative." Negative doesn't mean that they are lies. Big difference.

6
1
hiramfosterNov. 7, 12 7:44 AM

Well, no, voters deserve hardly any of the blame for how campaigns are conducted.

4
1
traderbillNov. 7, 1211:59 AM

Did you see where Anderson Cooper's show was cancelled? Why? Not because he came out and said he is gay but from low ratings, which he truthfully acknowledged rather than blame it on homophobia. Likewise, if voters didn't watch the antics of Rush Limbaugh, Ann Coulter and others on FOX News (sic), they would be forced to change their programming. Those who complain about CNBC would do well to note the lack of inflammatory namecalling relative to FOX. Viewers see Fox as entertaining...I see it as destructive to civility and information gathering. How many references have you seen in these comments to things that factcheckers disproved long ago. As for Dancing with the Stars, Idol, etc. they allow us to fantasize as if it was ourselves. Likewise the 'reality' shows, which are anything but, are cheap to produce and have replaced good programming. Thank God for PBS, NPR, and National Geographic channel. We have an electorate with the most information but least knowledge of facts in my lifetime. Most of the negative ads and the worst ones were from the SuperPacs. Sure there were a lot of negative ads and perpetuating lies by Team Obama but go to www.politifact.org and see that the whopper's came from Team Romney. Team?

1
0

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

  • about opinion

  • The Opinion section is produced by the Editorial Department to foster discussion about key issues. The Editorial Board represents the institutional voice of the Star Tribune and operates independently of the newsroom.

  • Submit a letter or commentary
Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT