The likely election winner? Gridlock

  • Article by: Doyle McManus , Los Angeles Times
  • Updated: November 5, 2012 - 11:52 AM

The winning presidential candidate is almost certain to face at least two years of divided government in Congress.

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elmore1Nov. 5, 1211:57 AM

Spot on! We need a moderate agenda and politicians that can work together. We voters are forced to vote for one extreme agenda or the other.

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my4centsNov. 5, 1212:09 PM

Gridlock is not such a bad thing. Certainly preferable over enacting Obamacare and giving special treatment to favored businesses. It was gridlock that caused Obama and the Democrats to keep income tax rates stable, rather than raising them on a select few. Hopefully, that same gridlock under a President Romney will lock in the current rates and allow everyone some assurance of stability.

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gadflyNov. 5, 1212:56 PM

"The winning presidential candidate is almost certain to face at least two years of divided government in Congress." Especially since there has to be at least a 60-40 Democrat advantage in the Senate to anything passed.

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ciamanNov. 5, 12 1:02 PM

In all truth, most voters want divided government and that is the way they want it to be. The American people no longer trust the federal government for anything. Better to keep it spinning its wheels rather then letting the bitter democrats or republicans get together. I know it was not always like this, but this is the recipe that we are dealing with now.

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gadflyNov. 5, 12 1:04 PM

"I'm going to have to reach across the aisle and meet with good Democrats who love America." So Romney's first attempt at reaching across the aisle is to say that anyone who disagrees with him hates America... Nice...

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gandalf48Nov. 5, 12 1:04 PM

It depends what you want to get accomplished...if your goals are going to hurt the economy (Obamacare, Cap & Trade and higher taxes) then gridlock is a good thing. If the gridlock affects issues like debt, SS and Medicare then it only makes those problems harder to solve going forward.

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palsarNov. 5, 12 1:21 PM

Hey, gridlock isn't so bad. Since the House went to the GOP neither side has been able to do whatever the heck they want. No more billions for worthless stimulus packages, no more breaks for "the rich," etc. Having one part in total control is NOT a good thing.

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ivehaditNov. 5, 12 1:27 PM

gandalf48: "if your goals are going to hurt the economy (Obamacare, Cap & Trade and higher taxes)..." Obamacare only helps the economy by lowering the cost of healthcare, lowering the deficit and keeping workers healthier. As for taxes, we had higher taxes under Clinton and Reagan and the economy boomed. Not so after the Bush tax cuts when the economy went through the worst boom and bust since 1929. The jury's out on Cap & Trade. It's amazing how willing the GOP is to wreck our economy to save the top 5% a few bucks in income taxes and to deny millions reasonable health care.

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gandalf48Nov. 5, 12 1:47 PM

ivehadit - [Obamacare only helps the economy by lowering the cost of healthcare, lowering the deficit and keeping workers healthier. As for taxes, we had higher taxes under Clinton and Reagan and the economy boomed. Not so after the Bush tax cuts when the economy went through the worst boom and bust since 1929. The jury's out on Cap & Trade. It's amazing how willing the GOP is to wreck our economy to save the top 5% a few bucks in income taxes and to deny millions reasonable health care.] *** Even advocates of Obamacare have admitted that it does very little to address costs. More needs to be done to address the cost drivers by increasing competition (fewer mandates and smaller companies allowed into the health insurance game), allowing cost comparison and individuals getting the same tax breaks as businesses (tax free premiums for one). I hate to tell you this but businesses thrived due to other factors...in the '80s the highest tax rates went from around 50%+ down to 28%...yes Clinton did raise tax rates but soon faced a recession and a bubble (tech bubble remember that?). Just because the internet came into its own in the '90s and business boomed doesn't disprove basic economics. If you increase taxes paid then you decrease the ability for the private sector to thrive...that's basic macro economics.

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dvsdan123Nov. 5, 12 1:53 PM

The problem is Congress. It had an approval rating of 9% yet 85% of incumbents running for re-election will get re-elected. I guess the only thing we hate more than the Status Quo is Change.

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