Recount on a ballot issue? Maybe not

  • Article by: RACHEL E. STASSEN-BERGER , Star Tribune
  • Updated: November 3, 2012 - 10:07 PM

When it comes to the ballot measures, any concern about the accuracy of the tally would have to be addressed by the courts.

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ginny6Nov. 3, 12 8:49 PM

Stop abuse of the constitution. Vote NO on both of these amendments.

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erikj3Nov. 3, 1211:55 PM

The most recent poll indicates that BOTH of these amendments have 51% of people voting NO. Let's hope that's the case, otherwise, future generation s are NOT going to be pleased with us...

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webceltNov. 4, 1212:22 AM

The key points is seems are 1. we have recounts every election, just not normally of statewide races, and 2. the recount rules are different for amendments. Something we learned in 2008 is that few of us knew election procedures, especially recount. Here's hoping people can learn ahead of time and cut down on the conspiracy theories inspired by 2008, when so many of us looked at everything we didn't immediately understand and assumed something villainous was in progress.

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elctrkNov. 4, 12 7:06 AM

Do you recall what Fritz Knack (sp?) said after the Franken-Coleman was finished? Here it is: "We tried to prove fraud. We couldn't" Word.

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elynn1Nov. 4, 12 7:51 AM

The purpose of a constitutional amendment is to restrain the government from acting. That's exactly what this one purports to do: restrains the government from redefining marriage in the future. You may agree or disagree with it -- and the votes will tell on Tuesday what Minnesota thinks -- but it's not "abuse" of the state constitution. This question is exactly the sort of thing that a constitutional amendment is meant to decide.

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ntaggartNov. 4, 12 8:26 AM

One of the best examples for the passage of voter ID is the Franken election. From the Washington Examinor August 6, 2012, York, paragraph 6; “…Fund and von Spakovsky report, 177 people have been convicted -- not just accused, but convicted -- of voting fraudulently in the Senate race. Another 66 are awaiting trial….” Franken’s felons created just enough voter fraud to throw the election, resulting in a bill called ObamaCare which seeks to put 1/6th of the economy under government control. This bill is not only unConstitutional, but if you read Roberts’ actual opinion (60 + pages) you realize that that it’s unConstitutional too! It is an incredible read, his opinion is weak and stilted and prone to be easily toppled.

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ntaggartNov. 4, 12 8:40 AM

BTW - Franken's felons numbered @ 1099.

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ntaggartNov. 4, 12 9:12 AM

BTW - Franken's felons numbered @ 1099.

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watergateNov. 4, 1210:00 AM

RE: ntaggart - Voter ID does nothing to prevent convicted felons from voting. Felons can have photo IDs, too -just ask convicted felons such as former Republican House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, or former Republican lobbyist Jack Abramoff (who spent 4 years in prison for corruption), or former Republican Congressman Randy "Duke" Cunningham (who is currently in prison). All of them have photo IDs. Asking for a photo ID won't prevent felons from voting at the polling places if they are recently paroled. And this bogus story about 1,099 convicted felons voting for Al Franken is just hogwash. When county attorneys and state officials investigated these outrageous claims, they found no evidence to support those charges. When prosecutors investigated the names of supposed felons that had been provided by Minnesota Majority (a conservative activist group), they found that more than half of the names on the list were inaccurate, or were people who were no longer barred from voting, or that the same names had been repeated multiple times. But conservatives keep spreading lies about "1,099 convicted felons" because they know that no one will vote for their bogus "Voter ID" amendment unless they can convince people to believe in a fantasy. And even if this wasn't a fantasy ("Over 1,000 gay unicorns stole the election!"), asking for a photo ID would not have prevented a single convicted felon from voting back in 2008. All a convicted felon would have had to do is to pull out his or her driver's licence. And what makes you think that felons voted for Al Franken instead of Norm Coleman? Did you read all of the secret ballots? For all you know, there could be 1,000 Republican felons voting one of their fellow Republicans. The State Republican Party was just fined $170,000 for violating Federal campaign regulations over a period of six years. That's a criminal offense. And I bet those guys all voted for Norm Coleman. But that's beside the point. The fact is, there *weren't* 1,099 felons who voted for Al Franken. That is a MYTH. So stop spreading misinformation!!!

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ntaggartNov. 4, 1211:53 AM

The fact is election fraud is happening in MN. Whether Franken’s felons (177 convicted for voter fraud with 66 more pending trial), Mike Hatch & Lori Swanson shaking down Capital One and funneling money to ACORN in exchange for political endorsements (Strib Jun 30, ’08), or the kind of fraud like what happened up in a Brainard Lakes nursing home where attendents registered residents then filled out and cast their ballots in their stead (see the Brainard Dispath for Mar 2, 2012), election fraud is happening and it’s a serious problem. These are just 3 real examples, there are many more. Voter ID is one way to curtail it.

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