Search halted for missing ship captain after 3 days scouring sea off NC; ship sank in Sandy

  • Article by: Associated Press
  • Updated: November 1, 2012 - 7:39 PM
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louieaNov. 1, 12 7:55 PM

Media coverage on this story continues to be elusive as to explaining why the ship even left its mooring in CT to sail to FL despite all of the warnings issued well in advance of this large storm. To set sail under these conditions was utter lunacy.

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breezybobNov. 1, 12 8:47 PM

"By the time the first rescue helicopter arrived, all that was visible of the ship was a strobe light atop the vessel's submerged masts. The roiling Atlantic Ocean had claimed the rest." Then where did this article's cover photo come from? There's still a lot more ship above the waves in that image. Is this an example of the press stretching the truth for added drama?

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william16Nov. 1, 12 9:40 PM

Too bad there wssn't a real-life mutiny on the Bounty to overturn the ship captain's foolish decision to set off into a massive storm. Had that happened, there seems a strong likelihood there would still be a ship and a full crew.

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BroonieNov. 1, 1210:09 PM

The Bounty was in Duluth for the Tall Ships expo in 2010. It didn't fit into the slip that was originally planned for it, so was docked kind of on the side of the harbor near the museum. My ex and I waited in a long line to tour it. Of course we took plenty of pictures, but had we had any premonitions that something like this would happen just 2 years plus a couple of months later, we would have gone back through the line again and used up our entire digital cards on it. RIP, Captain.

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owatonnabillNov. 2, 12 6:41 AM

What a shame! Not only for the deaths of the two crew members but because of the demise of that beautiful vessel. Owatonnabill attended the event that Broonie references and remember standing in line for well over an hour to tour the Bounty. In talking to various members of her crew Owatonnabill learned that many of them were hobbyists who shipped aboard Bounty to learn sailing as well as to just savor the experience. They were apparently not paid, professional sailors. In that light, one must wonder: A crew from 1789, well-trained in sailing and with probably similar rough experiences under their belt, may well have been able to navigate the ship to it's intended destination. What chance did the crew of hobbyists have, particularly after mechanical power was lost and all that was available was sail? Someone--probably several someones--should at the very least be doing some serious soul-searching.

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