Even bigger trucks are a public danger

  • Article by: NANCY MEULENERS
  • Updated: October 14, 2012 - 10:22 PM

Klobuchar and Cravaack should not be supporting this special interest.

  • 20
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
duenorth53Oct. 14, 12 7:09 PM

These trucks have been legal to run on the state highway system for a number of years with a fairly low number of incidents. However they have not been allowed to run on the Interstate system which is better built and a much safer road system. For these reasons I think our representatives should support this bill.

11
15
ldobieOct. 14, 12 7:38 PM

I wish you the very best in your recovery, however the national averages say that there is a 90% chance that you where at fault for the accident that hurt you. Four out of five truck car accidents are the fault of the 4 wheeler involved. I am guessing that you have not pushed for more education for people on how to drive around big trucks. the simple truth is you did not state the facts when it comes to truck weights. Large loads spred out over more axles do not do more damage than other trucks do. Trucks pay FAR FAR more money in taxes for the use of the roads you speak, and easly pay for any effect they have on roads and bridges. The simple truth is that with rising fuel cost, goverment regulations, insurance cost, repair cost, equipment cost, tolls, and lic. fees, revenue has to go up some how. Shippers are not raising payments, and brokers are taking an even bigger share of the pie. The result if things don't change will be fewer trucks on the road. I know that will make you happy, right up until the time the cost of the goods you buy reminds you that just about everything you use comes by truck. You realy want to do something good for public safty. Then turn your attention to why truckers work 70 hours a week for a $40-$45k job, and are gone 3 to 4 weeks a month. Drivers are tired, so when a 4 wheeler does something dumb around them people get hurt. The federal goverment should make it so trucking companies are not exempt from hours and wage laws, require them to pay by the hour and not mileage pay which pushes drivers to drive as far as they can, and pay overtime after 40 hours like everybody else. The problems you talk of are not the issue. By the way, I move loads that weight well over 600,000 pounds on the same roads you talk of, and the engineers have proven that we do no more harm to the roads than any other 80,000 lb. truck because of the number of axles, tires, and speed we travel. I wish you well.

18
17
greatxOct. 14, 12 8:35 PM

Nancy Meuleners, 80% of all car/ truck accidents are the fault of the car driver. If you, the driver of a four wheel vehicle, had to withstand the scrutiny of what I need for a CDL... and the need for a yearly DOT physical, we all would be safer. Is there a limit on the number of hours an automobile operator can drive per day, per week? Believe me there is for a CDL holder. Plus the fact that trucks DO pay more in registration and insurance than you, a car driver ever will. I have driven truck/ trailer combinations of over 130,000 lbs (9 axles), and worried every minute of what some car driver was doing going by me. Btw, just how do you think all those goods you see in Targets, Walmarts, and grocery stores get delivered?

16
14
reader2580Oct. 14, 1210:31 PM

Overtime for truckers over 40 hours would push the costs of shipping everything through the roof. Over the road truckers are usually away from home much of the so limiting them to 40 hours a week just means they sit at a truck stop for more hours. It isn't getting them home with their loved ones.

11
11
maddyinmplsOct. 14, 1211:05 PM

This op ed was brought to you by the nation's railroads and their attendant businesses. That is all.

9
16
patriotrightOct. 14, 1211:35 PM

Sorry about your accident And I wish you well; but the previous four comments are correct. Some drivers are gone from home more than three months at a time. The photo in the article is not from the United States. Except for the few interstates, Vermont's roads are like a third world country.

11
7
mdachsOct. 15, 1212:20 AM

I really feel for your loss. However, I think that all of us can count on the fact that if a car is in an accident with a truck, most of the time a car will lose the battle, regardless of how big the truck is.

16
1
greatxOct. 15, 12 6:42 AM

"it is downright irresponsible for members of Congress to put the request of one industry before the safety of the general public" --- They do it all the time... Why is Congress in the "safety" business? There is NO right to drive on the Interstate. When will Congress get out of the business of picking winners and losers?

7
10
davehougOct. 15, 12 6:51 AM

No matter how many axles, the load on a bridge is the same and it is OVER the design limit. Metal that has a very slight bend many times hardens then brakes. See the Sabo bridge that was brought down by mere vibration.

11
6
owatonnabillOct. 15, 12 6:51 AM

I agree with the majority of posters so far: The "danger" of trucks is all too often not with the trucks but with the bonehead driver in the '06 Impala. How many times on the freeway have we seen some nutcase accelerate to about 85 mph to pass a loaded truck, then get in front of the truck and immediately slam on his/her brakes to get back down to maybe 5 mph over the speed limit? Baaaaad idea--that space in front of the truck is maintained by the trucker because he KNOWS he's not gonna be able to slow down as fast as a car. Case in point: some years back owatonnabill knew a guy who was driving a loaded logging truck when some ditzy woman herding the Family Truckster down the road passed him, then immediately slammed on the brakes. The truck driver had two choices: hit the woman or hit the ditch. He chose the ditch. His load of logs came rolling over the cab, crushing it and killing him in the process. Statistically a deadly accident with a truck, but in reality an act of ultimate self-sacrifice. With the occasional exception, truckers are not the problem. Ms. Meuleners has it wrong.

14
6

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

  • about opinion

  • The Opinion section is produced by the Editorial Department to foster discussion about key issues. The Editorial Board represents the institutional voice of the Star Tribune and operates independently of the newsroom.

  • Submit a letter or commentary
Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT