Knocking on doors: The 2012 report

  • Article by: LORI STURDEVANT , Star Tribune
  • Updated: October 13, 2012 - 4:00 PM

A common theme candidates are finding is frustration with a gridlocked state government.

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pumiceOct. 13, 12 9:34 PM

Re: "People are sick of the gridlock. They want state government to work." Dunno, Ms. Sturdevant.... The two most common responses I heard when I knocked on doors in 2010 were "The legislature should do its job" (at the federal level, this translates to 'Congress should do its job') and "I'm tired of negative ads." Then the Electorate voted in a whole slew of Republican newbies 1/3 of whom (12 of 37 state senators and 25 of 72 state representatives) had signed the Norquist Pledge to never, ever raise taxes and most (all?) of whom who are averse to compromise.

Norquist puts more effort at the federal level--235 out of 242 Republican Members of the US House--including all four Republicans in Minnesota's delegation--signed the pledge. When one's stated goal is to “to get [government] down to the size where we can drown it in the bathtub [in 25 years]," the table of options is almost bare, "compromise” becomes a dirty word, and gridlock is the fastest way to accomplish one's objective.

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alansonOct. 15, 12 2:40 AM

For the last two years there has been no "gridlock" within the legislature, as one might infer from this commentary. The gridlock, if you must call it that, has been between the governor and the legislature. But the state has a budget for this biennium, a product of a compromise between the legislature and the governor. Both sides were unhappy, but that budget has actually turned out pretty well as the governor's pessimistic revenue projections proved to be grossly in error. And the legislature has passed easily two constitutional amendments - the DFL may not like them, but each has a good shot at gaining the approval of the people. So I guess one woman's gridlock is another's successful legislative session.

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ciamanOct. 17, 12 2:51 PM

In truth, gridlock is the common thing. Look at the Federal level. Most people serving in the Senate or the House do not talk with each other anymore. Nor do they go out for drinks and then talk about the various problems. In the State of Minnesota, I no longer open the door to hear more canards. I can make up my own votes from all the news that I hear or my friends. And I no longer have a phone to be bothered with. I have a Cell-phone and my number is only for my friends. That is the ticket folks.

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everamazedOct. 18, 12 7:57 AM

Gridlock is good. Glad to see the House doing the job they were elected to do -- stop spending.

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