Minneapolis no longer a Wi-Fi wastrel

  • Article by: ERIC ROPER , Star Tribune
  • Updated: October 8, 2012 - 10:56 PM

High-tech tools now tap costly bandwidth that once went unused.

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  • Comments

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pinky1933Oct. 8, 1210:54 PM

interesting but how secure is it?

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rshacklefordOct. 8, 1210:55 PM

"A dramatic push at Minneapolis City Hall to integrate wireless technology into more city services may eventually salvage millions of dollars that officials once thought was wasted on unused bandwidth." ---- Next up: salvage HUNDREDS of millions in wasted taxpayer dollars for a 330+ days per year unused second metrodome. Maybe Hodges should put some etab gambling machines in those squad cars that now have HD and every other distracting gadget. The arrested perps could play them while being transported.

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evilgrimaceOct. 8, 1211:16 PM

Great... we're throwing millions down the toilet so cops can watch Gangnam Style on YouTube from their squad cars! End this program NOW... there's nothing worse than socialized internet access!

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furguson11Oct. 8, 1211:58 PM

"The turnaround is largely the result of high-definition cameras and police squad cars, which are now helping gobble up the $1.25 million worth of bandwidth Minneapolis pays for every year." Great, we have MPD sharing all of their fingerprints with the department of homeland security through secure communities, collecting license plate information and hanging onto it and now filming everything. Smells like big brother to me.

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DufferHOct. 9, 12 1:13 AM

In other words, city officials had bought into a multi-million dollar boondoggle, so they had to create a use for it.

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ranger78Oct. 9, 12 7:19 AM

Rybak called it gov't creating a public good. The original premise was to make wi-fi available to all citizens of the city at a reduced rate. The fact that the city gov't is consuming the vast majority of the bandwidth (Including tracking sanding trucks. Who knew that was necessary beyond the radios they already had. Must be worried the drivers aren't doing their job.) loudly states this is a gov't good not a public good. This was unnecessary and wasteful from the start. Mpls is going to great lengths to try to justify their boondoggle.

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MplsSouthSideOct. 9, 12 7:51 AM

All the negativity about this article must be from folks who either don't live in Mpls or choose not to take advantage of the service. I have used the service since the inception of the program and have nothing but positive things to say about the price and the service!

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rhankinsOct. 9, 12 8:16 AM

pinky1933 In general, probably plenty secure for what they're doing with it. Off-the-shelf encryption is extremely difficult to break, even with massive resources, if correctly implemented. Attacks, such as traffic analysis, are probably possible, in which an attacker attempts to draw conclusions based on the amount of data flowing, rather than the data itself; such information might point an attacker to hot spots in the city where a lot of activity is occurring, but I'm not sure it would provide substantial specific information above what's available through other means. I suspect that there are easier targets, but government should ensure it doesn't become too complacent in how it uses shared networks.

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FrankLOct. 9, 12 8:59 AM

Miost of this sounds like make-work just to use bandwidth. The truer test is if the dept needed to pay for the bandwidth, could they still justify the use?

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Mister_EOct. 9, 12 9:02 AM

If you build it, they will come ... eventually.

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