Transplant ethics

  • Article by: KIRK C. ALLISON
  • Updated: October 7, 2012 - 12:25 PM

Honor for Chinese leader at the University of Minnesota dishonors victims, according to 22 local and national leaders in bioethics, medicine and human rights.

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davehougOct. 7, 12 2:36 PM

Nations have morals.........or LACK of them.

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isbjornmydogOct. 7, 12 5:02 PM

The U of M has been noted for top medical ethics and failed at the same time! This is a doubly whammy against e U and they should be ashamed for honoring a person, perceived by the world as a criminal!

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jli2013Oct. 7, 12 6:16 PM

Harvest organs from fellow human beings...this absolutely can not be allowed! The U should bring up this issue. Transplant ethics can not be compromised.

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fatredneckOct. 7, 12 6:29 PM

Chen has been Minister since 2007, so the evidence cited against him from 2006 is irrelevant. This statement also fails to show that the Ministry of Health at the central level bears responsibility for organ harvesting, which like many problems in China, may be more local than central. This doesn't mean there isn't a problem, but to blame Chen specifically seems simplistic.

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