Prairie therapy

  • Article by: KIM PALMER , Star Tribune
  • Updated: October 3, 2012 - 10:00 AM

A psychiatrist and autism expert restores her and her family's well-being by restoring her native landscape.

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wmmlOct. 3, 12 9:21 AM

What an extraordinary example of connecting children to (the benefits of) the natural world! Hopefully this will inspire parents of children with all abilities. (RE: your garden picture: just as there is evidence of the negative effects of red dye in children, red dye may also be harmful to hummingbirds and is not necessary to attract them sugar-water isenough-- why take the chance?)

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hjlazniOct. 3, 12 1:31 PM

As a psychologist, she relizes focus changers keep our minds healthy, especially when you add fresh air. I am amazed anyone can burn and put a nearby forest in jeopardy.

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earthymanOct. 4, 1212:08 PM

I remember when I was a young boy, I would go down and sit on a stump in our small degraded woodlot. This was usually after a family argument and I could no longer stand all the yelling. What a relief to just sit and stare at a big Red Oak. My mind would go to a peaceful place just as almost everyone who has witnessed a native prairie. There is the essence of The Great Creator in nature so why wouldn't all of nature be one of our best cures for many ailments?

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tmjt4Dec. 17, 12 1:27 PM

Thank you for writing this article. It is very interesting and informative and will hopefully encourage more people to spend time enjoying the wonderful outdoors. Even better if they are inspired to plant natives in their own backyards providing valuable nourishment and habitat for birds, butterflies, bees, frogs, etc.....

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