Fall art: Chinese warriors and a photo chameleon

  • by: MARY ABBE , Star Tribune
  • Updated: September 7, 2012 - 2:46 PM

'CHINA'S TERRACOTTA Warriors: The First Emperor's Legacy' Oct. 28-Jan. 20 at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts Dying was a capstone moment in the life of a Chinese emperor, which is why Qin Shihuang (259-210 B.C.) started building his tomb at age 13. New to the job, the young man launched a mortuary project that took 38 years and covered more than a square mile. Treasures and artifacts from the tomb of China's First Emperor, as Qin was known, make up some of the most dazzling archeological discoveries of the 20th century. And they are still being dug up nearly 40 years after the site was rediscovered by Chinese farmers digging a well. The 10 life-size terracotta warriors in this exhibit include several never seen in the West. They are from an army of 7,000 intended to protect the emperor in his afterlife. On loan from 13 Chinese institutions, the artifacts were excavated in 2005 and include bronze vessels, jade carvings, gold and silver ornaments, architectural elements and four life-size bronze birds -- a crane, a swan and two geese.

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