Dealer uses Mpls. license plate data in car repo

  • Article by: ERIC ROPER , Star Tribune
  • Updated: August 31, 2012 - 7:50 AM

In what may be a first, a business used the records collected by police.

  • 22
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
evldedAug. 31, 12 8:17 AM

Business loves big government intrusion when it makes them richer. This is your future. Even you GOP voters. They won't be asking for your voting record when they use this against you. And save the "I don't do anything wrong..." speech. That's never mattered before, why would it now?

5
7
FrankLAug. 31, 12 8:19 AM

So what happens when a jealous ex uses this info to track down a spouse? Should be released only under a court order.

11
2
shootzAug. 31, 12 8:31 AM

The Initial storie showed a stationary license plate reader on a telephone pull. Interesting how they changed the picture to this mobile car scanner..... Maybe the city does not want people top realize how much big brother is watching, and always watching not just on car scanners.

9
1
grandpa64Aug. 31, 12 8:49 AM

Look at you license plate. See the bar code? If you don't want the plate read, simply cover the bar code.

7
5
iliketobikeAug. 31, 12 9:12 AM

This is a very slippery slope. Privacy advocates need to stay on top of this technology and the cities abuse of it.

5
0
sheprico1Aug. 31, 12 9:19 AM

I am torn about this technology. On one hand, it bugs me to no tomorrow that law enforcement is watching and chronicling my movements as a citizen. On the other hand, I think it is great that this business owner was able to use the technology to reclaim what is his. Since I would classify failure to make car payment and then eluding your creditors as theft, I guess my conclusion is as long as the technology is being used to catch those who have most likely committed a crime, I suppose I support it despite my concerns about it being abused by government and business.

5
1
pwcgoldfishAug. 31, 1210:07 AM

If a private business or individual wants this information they should pay a fee. It cost us taxpayers money for this repo man to go in and utilize a gov't employee to dig through this info

11
2
privateeyeAug. 31, 1210:17 AM

Nice job sir. Glad you recovered your property.

5
0
jimmybobbyAug. 31, 1210:18 AM

While I have big issues with this on a privacy basis in principle, I am glad this guy repo'd this car from the sleazeball that skipped his payments. Access to the data should be on a need to know basis -- including among cops.

5
0
markspringAug. 31, 1210:44 AM

While I am glad that this person got his car repossessed, I am more concerned about the intrusion into innocent people's privacy. People who have done nothing wrong can be detained, have their phones tapped, have their license plates tracked, and many other even more alarming things. Slowly, but surely, our rights are being stripped away by government surveillance methods, i.e. Privacy Act, National Defense Act, medical records storage by those other than your medical service provider, scans at the airport, etc. There's a Biblical statement that applies here and it is, "A little leaven leavens the whole lump." We used to look at other countries, particularly those whose form of government is Communistic, and say how bad their actions were. Now our government is doing the very same thing. We are being monitored, surveiled, detained without cause, and so on, all in the name of "protection" against terrorists. When do we begin to say, "No"? When do we say that the government has no right to track, detain, tap, surveil anyone without cause and court order? Right to privacy was an important part of our Constitution. It should be just as important today.

3
0

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT