Possessed by money

  • Article by: BILL WARD , Star Tribune
  • Updated: August 29, 2012 - 3:19 PM

U of M researcher says the pursuit of money makes us selfish -- and focused.

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minn12Aug. 30, 12 2:39 AM

Seriously, is this a joke? I've never seen such psychobabble in all my life. Screen savers showing money or fish, and chairs being moved?? I'll bet this 'researcher' is getting some sort of government grant to study such utter nonsense. This whole thing is pointless...oh wait, now I get it. This is just another bogus slam on Romney, although they don't mention his name. Since he is wealthy, he must therefore be selfish, standoffish, and unable to 'connect' with people. Gosh, that just happens to be the liberal medial and Obama campaign narrative they are trying to foist on the American people about Romney. Well news flash: Romney is going to 'connect' with a lot of voters this November, and send Obama back to Chicago where he belongs.

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mike06597Aug. 30, 12 6:14 AM

You can give your "excess" money to the charity of your choice at any time and go back to living a simple lifestyle. Move along- no problem here.

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regionguyAug. 30, 12 6:48 AM

Over-simplified approach to this. What happens when you consider where people are in their life-cycle?

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mnnice33Aug. 30, 12 7:42 AM

Maybe another logical explanation for the changes in lifestyle is that she had more demands on her time as she became more successful thus the choices of the personal shopper, taxis, etc. As people become more successful in their careers they have less time and more responsibilities.

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tomstromieAug. 30, 12 8:19 AM

So, money is bad. Except when that money is used by the government to support those who are not self-sufficient including some of the 50% in our society that pay no income taxes at all. Got it.

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mpattockAug. 30, 12 4:08 PM

What an interesting story — and even more interesting to realize that it comes from the Carlson School of Management. Note that the story does NOT say that money is bad. It says that an exclusive focus on money fosters selfishness. That makes perfect sense. An exclusive focus on anything has effects good and bad -- whether the focus is on food, work, sex, exercise — you name it. The question always is: What is the healthy (and virtuous) balance? I recall that other, similar, studies have shown that not having enough money to live reasonably comfortably makes people unhappy, but having more money than they need does not make them commensurately happier. Or else billionaires would be deliriously happy, which they obviously are not! John C. Bogle, the president of the Vanguard Group (investment firm) said this in a commencement addres to the 2007 MBA graduating class at Georgetown: "Here’s how I recall the wonderful story that sets the theme for my remarks today: At a party given by a billionaire on Shelter Island, the late Kurt Vonnegut informs his pal, the author Joseph Heller, that their host, a hedge fund manager, had made more money in a single day than Heller had earned from his wildly popular novel Catch 22 over its whole history. Heller responds, “Yes, but I have something he will never have . . . . Enough.”

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