Big cargo steams into Duluth port

  • Article by: DEE DePASS , Star Tribune
  • Updated: August 17, 2012 - 8:46 PM

Wind turbines and mammoth mining equipment find easier -- and less expensive -- transit through the St. Lawrence Seaway.

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comment229Aug. 20, 12 5:02 AM

According to what I have heard from some politicians, all wind turbine products come from China. Apparently not. It always amazed me, that we have the technology to send an unmanned mission or TWO to mars, land a car sized rover on mars using the seven minutes of terror technology, and yet, we cannot develop the battery technology to promote electric cars at a price and effectiveness that would render most gas powered vehicles obsolete. I wonder what is holding this up? Better yet, I wonder WHO is holding this up?

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jcinmnAug. 20, 12 7:45 AM

FINALLY! Up to now the blades have come into Duluth from Europe. Now we're exporting them? Great News.

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jcinmnAug. 20, 12 7:53 AM

comment229 " It always amazed me, that we have the technology to send an unmanned mission or TWO to mars, land a car sized rover on mars using the seven minutes of terror technology, and yet, we cannot develop the battery technology to promote electric cars at a price and effectiveness that would render most gas powered vehicles obsolete. I wonder what is holding this up? Better yet, I wonder WHO is holding this up?" Most likely foreign competition for the Lithium Carbonate of which there is none in the US. Take your pick: Argentina, Australia,Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Portugal or Zimbabwe

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junifer15Aug. 20, 12 9:03 AM

"FINALLY! Up to now the blades have come into Duluth from Europe. Now we're exporting them? Great News" Is It really great news or is it propaganda meant to convince Congress that this failed industry is actually producing and needs the PTC's? I believe it's the latter. European countries, and China, have one by one started stopping the feed in tariffs that support their wind industries because they cannot afford them. This reads like an AWEA puff piece. I'd like to know what percentage of freight leaving Duluth harbor is for installing wind elsewhere. China makes this a lot more cheaply than we do, which is why companies like National Wind are looking to buy their components from over seas.

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junifer15Aug. 20, 12 9:55 AM

Check out these numbers on the cost of wind energy subsidies as compared to other sources of electrical generation. From the WSJ: The folks at the Institute for Energy Research used the Energy Department data to calculate a subsidy per unit of electricity produced. Per megawatt hour, natural gas, oil and coal received 64 cents, hydropower 82 cents, nuclear $3.14, wind $56.29 and solar a whopping $775.64. So for every tax dollar that goes to coal, oil and natural gas, wind gets $88 and solar $1,212. After all the hype and dollars, in 2010 wind and solar combined for 2.3% of electric generation—2.3% for wind and 0% and a rounding error for solar. Renewables contributed 10.3% overall, though 6.2% is hydro. Some "investment." Wind energy is hardly cost competitive, it does nothing to reduce CO2 emissions, and it contributes to the destruction of keystone species like bats. We cannot afford this.

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Douglind33Aug. 20, 1212:08 PM

You have to wonder...a steel company builds a steel plant on the Iron Range using imported steel...?

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jethellerAug. 20, 12 2:34 PM

It would be nice to use American steel, but Essar Steel is an Indian company. They are using steel that is produced from their own steel plants in other parts of the world.

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Douglind33Aug. 20, 12 9:04 PM

Guess where the iron ore comes from. Hint - it's shipped out of Duluth.

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