Editorial: Dakota War story can aid the healing

  • Article
  • Updated: August 11, 2012 - 6:22 PM

Ignorance has allowed resentment to fester for 150 years.

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jarlmnAug. 11, 12 6:31 PM

There is no disputing that the Dakota had a legitimate beef. But there is also no disputing that many of the Dakota committed what we today would easily identify as War Crimes, against innocent and unarmed settlers. Many Dakota openly bragged about how easy it was to kill the whites. No amount of politically-correct gloss-over posturing the Dakota as totally innocent victims, an "ignorance" of the worst sort, will effect any meaningful 'healing.'

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kamkamAug. 11, 12 7:23 PM

I will be interested in reading this series since our English Language Arts Common Core Standards require teaching objectives regarding the Minnesota Native Americans.

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kd5757Aug. 12, 1212:40 AM

I imagine that people who are being systematically exterminated will resort to extreme measures when fighting back. Atrocities beget further atrocities. However, when it came to the wholesale slaughter of innocent men, women, and children, the Native Americans didn't hold a candle to the white man.

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borisbadenovAug. 12, 12 9:24 AM

Time to move on... 150 years ago is several generations removed.

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shadowman7Aug. 14, 1212:36 PM

Genocide, destruction of civilizations and cultures, and taking a continent by force are not corrected by passage of time. Correction requires undoing the damage, learning from error, and adopting new ways. Sadly, some damage is irreparable. The systematic elimination of indigenous people and cultures is irreparable, just as the killing of 6 million Jews in WWII cannot be undone. When repair is not possible, we are left with learning from error and adopting new ways. Rather than do that, the United States has relentlessly used force to prop up a way of life that is unsustainable. At its core, American-style capitalism increases comfort for a few at the expense of many. In response to these articles remembering 150 years ago, we can expect the voices of our culture's usual suspects - "It is complicated." "The Indians got what they deserved." "After 150 years, isn't it time to move on?" "We gave them reservations and casinos, what more do they want?" "Indigenous people had the misfortune of being on land others wanted." Are we retelling events of 150 years ago to change something or simply to remind us that nothing has changed? After all, the system that produced genocide 150 years ago remains intact. What is amazing is our ability to be unaffected by serious issues. Genocide in the morning, the State Fair and pronto pups in the afternoon.

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