Twin Cities a hot spot for specialist visa program

  • Article by: ALLIE SHAH , Star Tribune
  • Updated: July 18, 2012 - 12:35 AM

The visas are being used by businesses and schools to attract top-tier talent from abroad to match employers' needs.

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jillie64Jul. 18, 12 6:07 AM

Math and Science,I guess they didn't think they needed those classes.All of the money poured into the Black Hole of the education system,and we have to bring in Brainiacs from other countries to fill these positions.HELLO,anyone getting the message?

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yen7565Jul. 18, 12 7:45 AM

The "have to" is questionable in some situations. Check out Tata's Board of Directors. Of course they want to use our visa program to help citizens of India live the good life in America. This has been going on in IT since the advent of the PC.

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elmore1Jul. 18, 12 7:46 AM

Minnesota Education Leaders, are you paying attention to this? Not only are jobs outsourced over seas but we need to bring people over here with the rights skills to fill critical needs. Sounds like an opportunity to keep more higher paying jobs in the US.

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ebenezerJul. 18, 12 7:50 AM

As a retired CIO for a major international company, I can tell you there is no shortage of qualified high tech personnel in this country. They are just seen as too expensive to hire by companies who cry wolf for more H1-B visa allowances. These H1-B folks are well trained and anxious to escape their home countries for the opportunities and pay in the US, even if the pay is lower than might be required for a US born citizen. However, the cries of shortages of qualified US citizen workers is a sham, and should be ignored by our political representatives.

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mypcaccountJul. 18, 12 8:00 AM

ebenezer hit it right on the head. Companies such as Accenture, IBM, Medtronic, etc have outsourced IT to save a few bucks on salaries. The college grads couldn't compete with 3 bucks an hour so they chose other degrees. Now those same companies are crying that we are not graduating enough IT kids so we need to expand the H1-B programs. Sorry, but we need to take care of our own first. Offshore if you must but you need to deal with the timezone issues, language barriers and traveling to 3rd world countries rather than bringing a cheap indentured servant to the US.

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tcsquaredJul. 18, 12 9:50 AM

Ebenezer is quite correct. I am a IT consultant and have seen this trend in corporate Twin Cities for years. Get rid of the locals (usually older, more expensive) and bring in the H1-B folks. The most interesting fact is that the quality goes WAY down, as witnessed by a high profile retailer's web site woes. At one corporate HQ, the current IT staff has a name for the H1-B invasion; "The Replacements".

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weisz015Jul. 18, 12 9:54 AM

What a sham!!!. Didn't we went through the phase when customer service was outsourced to India? Total failure. I remember I had spent over an hour with a customer service rep. from India just to get a call the next day from a supervisor that the info. provided to me was inaccurate. And Mayo clinic, is less and less impressive... I got much better care from specialists from the U. of M/Fairview.

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mnchatterJul. 18, 1210:11 AM

Large companies are actually rewarding (paying bonuses) to top level executives and managers to hire non-US applicants under the disguise of being global and inclusive. We (U.S.A.) are giving our jobs away. We tell people to "buy American" on one hand, while on the other we say come on over, we will give you a Visa and then you can stay here and take our jobs.

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alienfoeJul. 18, 1210:22 AM

There is no shortage of American talent here in Minnesota. Go look at the unemployment line and you will find plenty of qualified engineers, It people, and finance people. There should be a law that NO H1-B employees are hired until all qualified Americans are hired first.

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mikejohnson4Jul. 18, 1212:51 PM

As a *current* business owner in the sciences space, I can tell you first hand that ebenezer is quite wrong. It is actually very hard to find specialists for many STEM jobs. Personally, I have had several job openings for candidates in a specific mathematics/engineering field for the last 14 months. As a smaller business who asks employees to travel I am pretty much out of the H1-B game. Everyone on my payroll is American so I am not one of the "evil capitalists".

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