Flood's mud clouds Lake Superior

  • Article by: JOSEPHINE MARCOTTY , Star Tribune
  • Updated: June 28, 2012 - 5:24 AM

Scientists are studying the long-term implications because big storms are more common.

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Douglind33Jun. 27, 12 9:55 PM

The flood is staining a 350-mile long lake that’s 222 fathoms deep. Superior has a volume of 1,000,000,000,000,000 (one quadrillion) gallons, and it’s estimated that it would take 190 years to refill the L. S. basin if it drained out.. Superior is still one of the cleanest lakes in the world, with an average visibility depth of 27 ft. This silt will take years to settle out of the water in L. Superior.

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jcinmnJun. 27, 1210:37 PM

In the meantime I'm concerned about the safety of Duluth & Superior drinking water. First it was the asbestos in the 70's. Now it's the clay, silt and assorted other ---- from the surrounding watershed.

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eddie55431Jun. 27, 1210:54 PM

Did a scientist really say, "No light down to 30 feet"? That sentence doesn't even make sense! Obviously, if the water is cloudy, light is absorbed in the first few feet. Shouldn't she have said, "No light beyond (whatever is the recorded limit)"? Also, two opposite comments from experts, one saying that there are more storms than ever before, and the other saying that we are in a predictable normal cycle. No analysis of that? A good reporter would have gone back to the first scientist for a comment after receiving the longer term information.

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eddie55431Jun. 27, 1211:00 PM

Not one scientist mentioned the fact that they have the first opportunity to study the flow patterns in the lake with the largest dye marker EVER! Of course, if a few satellite photos replace years of grants for studies on a smaller scale they wouldn't get as much funding and would be out of a job.....oops!

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bflyJun. 27, 1211:46 PM

I hope there is no lasting impact to the lake. Only time will tell. It's a real treasure to the state of Minnesota and we should be looking for solutions to prevent this runoff from future rainfall as the trend for heavy rains continues.

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wildfoxJun. 28, 1212:03 AM

Last account Lake Superior was down 6 feet ... mother nature will correct humans intrusions to our planet.

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hrearden57Jun. 28, 12 6:57 AM

14000 years ago Minnesota was covered with a glacier.

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wise1Jun. 28, 12 7:06 AM

"Last account Lake Superior was down 6 feet ... mother nature will correct humans intrusions to our planet."----------------Lake Superior has never been "down 6 feet", the maximum difference between record high (602.86 1876) and record low (598.23 1926) is 4.5 feet. Currently it is 601.1 which is up about 2 feet in the last 3 years. The lake has been trending to lower levels, but episodes like the recent storm can have dramatic effects in a very short time. Mother Nature? I don't think so, Duluth has had 11 1 in 100 year rain events since 1950. 0

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barrelstoveJun. 28, 12 7:42 AM

Lake Superior will be fine and will outlast humans.....

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RichardsorJun. 28, 12 7:44 AM

Sailed from Cornucopia WI to Sand Island last weekend. Lake was not only very cloudy miles offshore ,but there were hundreds of whole trees and many logs and vegetation floating eveywhere. Will be no shortage of driftwood for fires for years to come. Boaters beware...

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