Minneapolis battling a bumper crop no one wants

  • Article by: BILL McAULIFFE , Star Tribune
  • Updated: June 10, 2012 - 11:50 PM

In Minneapolis and elsewhere, aquatic weeds have been emerging plentifully, and ahead of schedule.

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mnmonkeyboyJun. 10, 1210:42 PM

Why are we spending money on this? According to conservatives The only role of government is to build roads and stop gays.

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elementxJun. 10, 1210:59 PM

It's probably due to fertilizer runoff from yards on the lakefront.

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antisuburbsJun. 10, 1211:07 PM

It is because everybody has to have perfect lawns that require fertilizer and other chemicals that run off into the lakes. The use of native grasses should be encouraged in Minneapolis to prevent these problems. (Also, how does a zero-maintenance lawn sound? pretty sweet, right?)

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my2colliesJun. 11, 12 1:01 AM

I wish the harvested lake weeds could be made available to home gardeners. I would love to get a big bunch of that to compost or to add directly to my vegetable garden!

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comment229Jun. 11, 12 6:01 AM

A long long time ago, people found no way to deal with another problem and tossed it any way they could get rid of it; the product was called gasoline. It is time to make lemonade out of lemons and come up with a way to harvest this and use it; food for livestock? humans? or biomass for energy? Maybe, just maybe, this isn't a problem?

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orono77Jun. 11, 12 6:54 AM

@ elementx and antisuburbs :: Early warm temperatures are undoubtedly to blame for this increased yield. Fertilizer may / may not have played a role. Thus far no evidence that said fertilizer even helps, or for that matter hurts, milfoil.

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orono77Jun. 11, 12 6:56 AM

@ my2collies :: It is available to garners. You need only go to the Landscape Arboretum, which is where they take it once harvested. It's then used as fertilizer for all their plants. I've spoken with staffers doing the work and they tell my anyone can go get some for personal use. The one danger being that people could wittingly or unwittingly spread the plant to other bodies of water.

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orono77Jun. 11, 12 6:59 AM

@ comment229 said :: "A long long time ago, people found no way to deal with another problem and tossed it any way they could get rid of it..." Funny thing is that that's exactly how we got the Minnehaha Creek Watershed District, which for all intents and purposes is very much like milfoil – growing to fast / invasive and nobody wants or understand its role, including them.

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fouledanchorJun. 11, 12 7:08 AM

comment229 wrote: "It is time to make lemonade out of lemons and come up with a way to harvest this and use it; food for livestock? humans? or biomass for energy? Maybe, just maybe, this isn't a problem?" - - - - I like the way you think!!! However, before we can make "aquatic weed lemonade", two things need to happen; How can the Government regulate it?, and How can the Government tax it? (It's just like making "solar lemonade").

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tpods1Jun. 11, 12 7:13 AM

Copper Sulfate for the algae

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