Editorial: A misleading push for religious liberty

  • Article
  • Updated: May 24, 2012 - 8:37 PM

North Dakota voters should say no to 'Measure 3.'

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nasethMay. 24, 1210:53 PM

I think North Dakota would find some unintended consequences with passage, like most legislation of this nature. Namely, I'd bet North Dakotans would be surprised what "other" religions are practiced in their state, and thus also entitled to new levels of influence.

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wtfwaldoMay. 25, 12 6:38 AM

That's just what ND'ers want. A bunch of smug condescending Minnesota "F's" telling them what they should do, then using a picture of an abandoned farmhouse to represent what North Dakota is in their eyes... an abandoned tundra hugging the Canadian border.

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owatonnabillMay. 25, 12 7:08 AM

I know nothing about this proposed ND constitutional amendment, and certainly don't expect the Strib to present a nonbiased analysis. But if the process is legal, then let the process go ahead and let the issue be settled by the SCOTUS if it comes to that. It is the right of the people of NoDak to decide their own direction, after all.

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zippo12May. 25, 12 7:23 AM

It is one of the peculiarities of Democracy that the people who most love advancing their causes through democratic means are also the ones who if ever truly given power would end the rights of all that oppose them.

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meadows18May. 25, 12 7:26 AM

"the proposed state constitutional amendment -- known as "Measure 3" -- would potentially allow one person's religious beliefs to infringe on others' rights".

That has been happening for years. Every time one person, who believes in the religion called atheism, decides he doesn't like something like prayer in public spaces we are forced to change for that one person. So, what are you complaining about?

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mnpls123May. 25, 12 7:44 AM

" Every time one person, who believes in the religion called atheism, decides he doesn't like something like prayer in public spaces we are forced to change for that one person."------------------------ You can pray to your gods and bark at the moon for all I care. Just don't require others to participate in your beliefs. As far as the tinfoil hat argument that atheism is a religion - if people don't believe in Santa, does that make that a religion as well, after all it is based on your lack of believing.

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mnpls123May. 25, 12 7:48 AM

"an abandoned tundra hugging the Canadian border." ----Truth hurts doesn't it. The only thing that would have made this picture more accurate is a toothless hick in overalls chewing on a piece of straw.

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yourauntsisMay. 25, 12 9:16 AM

Welcome to the beginning of the American Inquisition. There is a reason our founding fathers wrote in a separation of church and state. It had nothing to do with prayer in schools or religious Christmas displays, and everything to do with a religion's, ANY religion's, values being forced on the general populace. Kindly remember that most folks who came to this country were running to escape religious persecution. Now, over 200 years later, we have a gigantic force of people who claim to be "Godly" trying to persecute the rest of society with their individual belief systems. I happen to have very strong religious beliefs. I don't believe I have the right to impose those beliefs on others. I believe that I can influence others by my love for them, not by trying to bend and force them to my way. The United States is not a theocracy, we are a secular democracy and if we don't like something, like abortion or birth control, if it goes against your personal beliefs, than in this free democracy, we do not have to have an abortion, or use birth control. We do not, however, have the "right" to force others not to do so. I'm sick and tired of hearing "I don't want to pay for....." Well frankly, I don't want to pay for a lot of things, but I'm not going to impose my personal preferences on anyone else. Religion is the purview of churches, synagogues, mosques, temples, etc.; if you want to run the government and force your religious beliefs on the general populace, then you need to give up your tax-free status - all properties and incomes (even the income on Sunday offerings), needs to be taxed. You cannot have it both ways. Religious organizations are given the gift of tax-free status because they are a separate entity from the secular government. If they want to legislate from the pulpit, then they need to pay taxes.

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orpheus90May. 25, 12 9:19 AM

meadows18 writes: Every time one person, who believes in the religion called atheism, decides he doesn't like something like prayer in public spaces we are forced to change for that one person ... Oh please. Claiming that public secularism is tantamount to enforced atheism is one of the most self-indulgently smug and deceitful claims the right wing has ever perpetuated. You may as well argue prohibition of graffiti in public spaces constitutes an infringement of - if not hostility to - free speech.

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falcon1679May. 25, 12 9:40 AM

meadows18 - That has been happening for years. Every time one person, who believes in the religion called atheism, decides he doesn't like something like prayer in public spaces we are forced to change for that one person. So, what are you complaining about? -------------- Well, last time I checked, Atheists didn't wage a 3 century long war of religious persecution.

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