In politics, business as usual

  • Article by: D.J. TICE , Star Tribune
  • Updated: May 12, 2012 - 5:51 PM

Despite the apparent political insurrections of recent years, we're shocked, shocked to learn that the spoils of legislation are going to some very familiar recipients.

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tpods1May. 13, 12 7:39 AM

When I rate employee performance the first area I address is open to change. In business if you are not open to change in today's environment you will fail. For our sports teams we are ready to fire a coach after one or two years of poor performance, talk about open to change. In government we are a 50-50 nation. We dig in. We defend the indefensible. It's easier to defend, make excuses, and demonize the other side. Add in the money it takes to run for office and you have a nation of political panderers. When someone like the Wisconsin Governor takes bold action the other side can't even wait until the next election to see how it works and then vote. Moderation is something that we can't seem to do. We will continue down this path until it breaks and it will. That's how Europe and states like California get in the mess they do. All in the name of good intentions and fairness.

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briechersMay. 13, 12 8:45 AM

Democrats are the authors of the government-centric top-down world we live in today. There are a few successes, but many failures. Republicans are rarely the advocates, but play the role of the “loyal opposition” to make sure the federal government does not get too big too quickly. These folks are called moderates for those following along with your program cards. Big corporations, big banks and big unions have been the greatest beneficiaries of this top-down structure. This powerful combination is daunting. They have the money and people power to fight change or to make change an advantage for their self-interests, and in my opinion, at the risk of our country’s future. There are others too who advocate for more top-down government. Senators, once elected to represent the state, are now firmly in the camp of government-centric top-down government with power that is apparently intoxicating to most of its members. The mainstream media moves easily from advocating the vision of the so-called intellectual elite (big advocates of top-down government) with furrowed brow when they read from a script to shiny-objects reporting when they think for themselves. They are almost frighteningly inept and without intellectual depth. Change is coming…there are many ugly scenarios of what that change might be. Will we pick a path that avoids the worst of them? Stay tuned…the next act is just about ready to start.

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alansonMay. 13, 12 5:54 PM

The end point of all this is Greece, the very embodiment of the all-gain, no-pain politics of mutual backscratching. We're headed right down the road to Hellas, with the unstoppable inertia observed by Mr. Tice.

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hrearden57May. 13, 1211:03 PM

America is broke. Government spending is out of control. How do you compromise on that. We are broke.

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tpods1May. 14, 12 7:43 AM

Thanks for making my point. 50% like it and 50%^ don't.

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dsteele04May. 14, 12 8:07 AM

Where did our problems begin? Aren't they traceable to government actions and also inaction inspired by powerful political campaign contributors? Considering the number of us seeking change what's preventing it besides a few dissenting Justices? Media ownership? Media that fails to carry the words of the members of Congress and The Senate, such as Bernie Sanders and John Yarmuth amongst others, along with past Presidential Cabinet members and other noted citizens who've over the past year been publicly inspiring citizens to use the internet to gain overwheming public opinion to force campaign funding reform. How many citizens did their words reach from the 1% of media that carried their message? 1%, that familiar percentage today. This is where we live! Not because many citizens are apathetic but due to loss of that conscience of nations, fair media. Would you suggest investigation would be required to support my claim of media unfairness or might a simple showing of hands be sufficient?

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