Burger King becomes first national chain to pledge cage-free pork and eggs

  • Article by: TRACIE CONE , Associated Press
  • Updated: April 25, 2012 - 9:00 PM
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wdwm01Apr. 25, 12 8:03 AM

Overall, it's a baby step; nonetheless, it's excellent news.

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carodun133Apr. 25, 12 9:00 AM

Even though I love making lots of fun of the PETA folk, like telling people I am a memeber of the Movement for Ethical Animal Treatment or M.E.A.T., I have to say this is just plain common sense. I hate it when I see birds and animals caged. When I saw a special on the way food animals were treated it did make me sick. Didn't make me give up meat, but did make me sick. I am glad Burger King did this and I wish other fast food chains would do the same.

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citygirl401Apr. 25, 12 9:21 AM

This is the best piece of news I've heard in a long time! After watching the movie Food Inc., I was disgusted by the cruel and inhumane treatment of animals used for food. Animals are God's creatures and should be treated with dignity and respect. I now only eat meat and eggs that are cage free, grass fed, humanely raised. Knowing the animals had some sort of quality of life is worth every additional cent I'm paying for dinner.

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SheriTApr. 25, 12 9:36 AM

The pork that is being used is not coming from hogs that have been confined to a crate during gestation. That would be a sow or a mother pig that produces babies, these babies are then raised to produce the meat that is used. They are not housed in a confined crate. Someone needs to get the truth out. The crates are only used for when the sow is going to give birth and for only a short period of time while the piglets are nursing. What is more humane, surviving birth or being crushed by the mother? Someone will need to give up land for building homes and businesses if you want to have "free range" chicken and hogs. In order to produce the quantities that are used, it will take more land. Think about it :)

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ziggymApr. 25, 12 9:42 AM

I'm not sure this is as nice as it seems. I don't know about pigs, but I know that a lot of chicken farms raise chickens, from fluffy baby chick to full-grown, in a shed-type structure, still stuffed to the hilt with chickens (just not in cages), and they NEVER see the light of day. They live their entire lives in the dark, and still in their own filth, on the ground of the shed. Oh well, hopefully if we keep up awareness with the public and BK, we can make even better changes.

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aeneumanApr. 25, 1210:39 AM

Done without the government mandating it. Great news.

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mongoose32Apr. 25, 1210:54 AM

While animal welfare is not very high on my priority list, I have a recently acquired appreciate the effort. The Strib ran an op-ed piece on humane farming methods a few weeks back that peaked my interest enough to do a little research on what all of the different terms actually mean. I was surprised to find out cage-free, while it does not require any outdoor access, was slightly more humane than free-range as free-range does not ban the practice of forced moulting thru starvation & does not ban debeaking. Cage-free does not cirectly ban debeaking, but the practice is left up to the farmer. Also, free-range does not mean anything close to the idea one might get of chickens roaming free in large, open barnyards. It means they simply get to spend some time outdoors, but there is no requirement as to how much. At any rate, if anyone is interested in obtaining a better understanding of the definitions behind the various certifications I found the Mayo Clinic's site to be one of the easiest to navigate & most informative without getting too deep.

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quincy7981Apr. 25, 1211:10 AM

Wayne Pacelle, president of the Humane Society: "So many tens of thousands of animals will now be in better living conditions..." until we eat them.

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roadtoruinApr. 25, 1211:47 AM

I once was at a stoplight next to an entire truck of caged turkeys. The looks on their faces was almost enough to make me want to give up eating meat. ALMOST, but not quite enough. Of course if I had to see caged up turkeys or other livestock on a daily basis, I think I would eventually give up meat altogether.

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gsacksApr. 25, 12 1:10 PM

I'm willing to pay an extra penny an egg for cage free chickens. And I've been doing so for years. I also try to buy meat and dairy that is untouched by hormones, and raised naturally. I know that the terms 'natural', 'cage free', and 'free range' in reality do not exactly match the images that one conjures up in the head when you hear these terms. But every little bit helps, and I do believe that an animal raised in more humane conditions is also healthier to eat.

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