Why we don't want to retire

  • Article by: KATY READ , Star Tribune
  • Updated: April 3, 2012 - 2:31 PM

Today's active 60-somethings are living and working longer than ever.

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railroadApr. 4, 1210:34 AM

Are you nuts? I couldnt wait to hit the door when I turned 60. Nothing could keep me working. I have all the free time in the world now and wouldnt change a thing..

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smarterthanuApr. 4, 1211:53 AM

I'm not quitting until 66 1/2- and I might go longer than that. There is no reason for an able person to be vegetating, no matter what their age.

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awshucksApr. 4, 1211:59 AM

re: "Nothing could keep me working." -- Congratulations on your decision, and a happy retirement to you! I, on the other hand, love my work, and hope to keep doing so until at least my early 70's. I will no doubt work somewhat shorter hours and take more time off, but as I approach 60, I dread the idea of leaving my work and trying to fill my days with recreation for the next who knows how many years. Please just don't think I'm nuts for loving to work!

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cheiron55402Apr. 4, 1212:20 PM

Some retirees return back to work because they're not financially set to retire.

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jafblumpkinApr. 4, 1212:33 PM

Us college educated, hard working, non-union types will have to work till we die. Retirement isn't in the cards.

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mnchatterApr. 4, 12 2:20 PM

I want to retire on my terms, not someone else's. I am healthy and have no reason to leave the workforce. If employers considered the fact that at age 65,Medicare is the primary benefit provider, the dollars saved there alone should make them VERY interested in the 65+. I have seen too many older retired couples get bored with life and each other and vegetate. It is truly sad. They could volunteer and do any number of interesting activities, but the choose to vegetate. Not me. I am going out on healthy and happy. Maybe retired, maybe not. It is all about attitude.

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ddellwoApr. 4, 12 4:03 PM

While I am over a decade away from the time that I would even begin to think about retirement, I have to say that from this vantage point, the idea of quitting work and doing absolutely nothing doesn't hold much appeal to me. Sure, it might it be nice for a summer, but after that I suspect it would get really boring, really fast. While I may not necessarily want to do the daily 9-5 grind anymore, I would love to work part time (maybe at a job I'd like to have, rather than at a job I need to have?) for as long as I am physically able to do it!

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ningaubleApr. 4, 12 5:18 PM

The choice at retirement isn't between working and doing nothing."Know thyself" is the best way to approach retirement successfully. If working is what makes you happiest, go for it. I personally enjoy my job in IT but music is my calling. I'm looking forward to devoting as much time to music as possible in retirement, and if it yields a bit of income that will be a bonus.

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mensanApr. 5, 12 9:37 AM

In some ways, work has replaced family and neighborhood for giving a sense of connection and belonging. That said, it's also a great way to express social interest!

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shutson88Apr. 15, 1211:37 AM

If there are so few young workers, as this story seems to suggest, why do we currently have the lowest employment rate for ages 18-24 in 60 years? On the contrary, I would question whether older, more experienced and "reliable" retired age people taking pay cuts to enter new industries might be squeezing out younger workers from these industries. I find it hard to commiserate with 60, 70 somes who are having a hard time finding jobs when not only young people but also middle-aged people who were laid off during the recession are in the same situation with more needs and less choice.

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