MAC seeks study on links between jet noise, health

  • Article by: PAT DOYLE , Star Tribune
  • Updated: March 24, 2012 - 10:12 PM

A long-range study backed by the MAC aims to find out whether the rumble of jet engines rattles human health, not just windows.

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furguson11Mar. 25, 1212:12 AM

About 1,610,000 results in 0.37 seconds on Google.

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jake55417Mar. 25, 12 1:00 AM

I enjoy the sounds of the city. I find it relaxing. I live in South Minneapolis and I don't find the noise a problem. The sound proofing installed in my neighborhood is sufficient.

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minneg56Mar. 25, 12 6:55 AM

You mean to tell me that people in the 'sound enslaved' South Minneapolis area have been reduced to nothing more than experimental data? Wow! At least provide some peanuts as we run your spinning wheel! I guess it's easier to ask for forgiveness after the health has been ruined - rather than to get the information right before you've wrecked a person's health.

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teddygMar. 25, 12 8:21 AM

I am no fan of MAC. This study's conclusions are already pre-determined. They will find there is just enough health effect to demand construction of a new airport further south. Yet another 'empire-building' body that answers to no one but gets to spend tax and fee money freely. This madness needs to stop. The governor needs to take the lead and put some accountability into organizations like the MAC and Met Council.

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tatyana77Mar. 25, 12 8:28 AM

I am glad noise is finally being considered in terms of health. Even neighborhoods not affected by airport noise experience constant noise from power tools, that can emanate through a block or more. We would be better off if the power blower had never been invented. Not only does it stress those in its audio path, but the users might be better off to sweep and in so doing, get some exercise.

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norunnyeggsMar. 25, 12 9:08 AM

I smell a money grab!

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nohopeobamaMar. 25, 1211:20 AM

How about a cost analysis/benefit regarding the MAC?

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elkriverscotMar. 25, 1211:29 AM

Then we need to study the effects of everyday life on animals. After all, these creatures may be as fragile and delicate as the poor oppressed citizens of Minneapolis and area. Look at what we've turned into. Pity. Talk about self centered victims.

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jimspensleyMar. 25, 1211:51 AM

Twenty years after SMAAC raised the noise impact issue in the dual-track studies, 15 years after the Munich school studies, 10 years after convincing U.S. studies, and 20 months after the World Health Organization warning, MAC has -- without admitting any of the studies might apply here -- asked for another local noise impact study. The didn't pick up on the efforts MAC made over the last 2 years to avoid acknowledging the health studies. Thanks to Council Member John Quincy, a halfhearted NOC suggestion morphed into MAC's request. The prospect of more noise exposure as a result of new flight paths and more expansion of MSP created an informed public outcry that MAC could ignore at its peril. The next step is to delay further expansion and re-do the flight path changes. An important finding in the health studies was that projected annual average daily noise (DNL) is useless as a predictor of health and school perfomance near busy airports. Perhaps FAA and MAC will become tired of sharing liability with the airlines for the damages caused by inappropriate airport operations. MSP is the physically smallest site by far among the busiest U.S. airports, with a huge population living and working near the airport. Uninformed opinions about the noise impacts only reinforce airline propaganda about the long-term safety of urban airports.

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ranger78Mar. 25, 12 1:01 PM

Oh my is norunnyeggs ever right. We are going to see people crawling out of the woodwork to get the cash they think they'll deserve as a result of this study. And it's all free money because it comes from the taxpayers.

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