$100 million in flour power to transform Pillsbury A-Mill

  • Article by: JIM BUCHTA , Star Tribune
  • Updated: March 23, 2012 - 11:11 PM

The transformation of a historic Minneapolis mill into low-income housing for artists is the city's biggest residential construction project.

  • 28
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
jonnoMar. 23, 1210:22 PM

Holy cripes, are you kidding me? This is like three really bad stories all wrapped into one!

15
26
noggnbloggnMar. 23, 1211:33 PM

What a waste! You will NEVER, EVER, make back your investment. Might as well burn the money, it is worthless anyway.

17
31
bwikMar. 23, 1211:49 PM

I am not familiar with how low income housing is a priority in this area. We have a ton of vacant real estate available at rock bottom prices. The city taxpayers are going without, in danger of tax confiscation of their homes due to high taxes on depressed priced real estate. The need for funding this is nil and the price is high. And I am 100% an architectural preservationist. I am as far as you can go to that goal. But this is too far. It should fund itself without ANY requirement for so called affordable housing. This is the nation's best employment city. Hard work is the answer, not giveaways.

26
22
Rapid1Mar. 23, 1211:50 PM

"It's going to be an amazing project." “low-income housing was the only economically feasible option” Amazing double speak, because it’s not economically feasible…

21
23
lawolmstedMar. 24, 12 1:03 AM

It would have been great if Schafer Richardson could have made it work with the A-Mill. But, after foreclosure this gran'daddy of a mill is basically going to seed. Letting an iconic piece of Minneapolis history wither is certainly an option, it wouldn't be the first time. But if it's going to be kept, contributing to the character of the quarter and supporting residential life by the river is a big win for the city. Most city riverfronts are shells of their former selves, either decrepit or dreadfully sanitized of life. The A-Mill development was supposed to be the culmination of all the recent projects that arose by the Falls and its environs — seriously glad this will be happening and I hope the project will be thoughtful and collaborative in its execution.

25
9
writerxxMar. 24, 12 6:32 AM

Must agree, that this is a very expensive gambit with little prospect of any sort of payback. First, who gets to live here, artists? Who gets to determine what is art? One of the great oxymorons is "abstract art" since most of it is junk. I'd be interested in seeing how they qualify the artist that they allow to move into this mess and when do they stop qualifying as an artist in need or are no longer considered an artist. This is a major boondoggle if I ever saw one.

21
26
tpnelsonMar. 24, 12 6:45 AM

Reality check!! Ask the homeowners and business owners in the area if this is a good idea.

24
17
professamc2Mar. 24, 12 7:52 AM

So many silly knee-jerk reactions against a great idea. If you want a example of an extremely successful low-income artist community living in a wealthy part of a city, look at the Westbeth Artist Community, built in an abandoned site of Bell Telephone factory in the West Village in Manhattan. This is a wonderful use of the site. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westbeth_Artists_Community

22
14
pomooneMar. 24, 12 8:31 AM

professamc2 - you don't have to look all the way to Manhattan. The Carlton Artist Lofts on University in St. Paul are a perfect example of how this sort of development can be successful. I think this whole conversation is silly. We just spent $1 billion dollars to help 9,000 cheeseheads cross the St. Croix. Few posting on the Strib had any problem with that boondoggle. But a private investor seeking a mix of federal and state financing to develop one of our state's most iconic buildings, and to convert that site to support low-income artists is lambasted as waste? Seriously. From now on, I am just going to assume that any public investment that is made within the city borders of Minneapolis and St. Paul is going to be considered "welfare," but identical projects made in the burbs are "investments."

28
12
ChachiMar. 24, 12 8:35 AM

The world needs art.

22
14

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT