Diversity in St. Paul school choice mix

  • Article by: DAAREL BURNETTE II , Star Tribune
  • Updated: January 31, 2012 - 10:25 PM

In St. Paul, 20 percent of seats would be saved for students in need.

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salsipuedesJan. 31, 1210:23 PM

Seventy percent of St. Paul's school age kids are in need. How about improving the schools across the board?

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mpmailJan. 31, 1210:51 PM

Enough of the failed social experiments! This approach has been tried year after year, and failed, since you ruined our communities with your busing program back in the 1970's. There's a reason that schools were built in every neighborhood. We used to walk to school. To the school in our community. The neighbors knew who was a "regular" & who was not by watching us pass by every day. If some unrecognized kid(s) were around, people would watch a little closer. Accountability. We would play sports at the neighborhood park with other kids from our school/community. The parents would be there as well. People knew one another. There used to be a real sense of pride in every neighborhood, now you have 5 kids on the same block who don't even know each others name & attend 5 different schools - some as far as 13 miles away? We don't need more buses and the expense they create (or the pollution), we need to get education back to its foundation, back to the neighborhoods.

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abovethelies2Jan. 31, 1211:53 PM

Its great to see an academic administration trying to improve the students quality of education. It would be great if Osseo High School could follow suit because they have a 33% failure rate for all kids at 2nd tri midterm grades.

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runotkiddingFeb. 1, 12 7:47 AM

Anti-white sentiment runs very strong within the Saint Paul public schools (I know, my kids go there). Now there is another 20% set aside for members of the non-white majority who runs the district. With whites being only 25% of the student population, they have very little say in how benefits in the system are parceled out.

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tobias0227Feb. 1, 12 8:12 AM

@runotkidding: Where did you read anti-white sentiment in the article? I read that the board is trying to keep access open to students from marginalized backgrounds in highly sought-after schools in St. Paul. And what data do you have to support that the majority of people running the district are non-white? Seems like you just have a personal issue with your kids' education.

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LARRYBOZOFeb. 1, 12 8:17 AM

The choice is gone when they start reserving space for certain groups. They just want to have their structure enhanced. We need to get back to schools run for the students.

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bloomburgerFeb. 1, 1212:59 PM

Another hand out by the open borders lobbyists.

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LARRYBOZOFeb. 2, 12 7:44 AM

The choice is gone when they start reserving space for certain groups. They just want to have their structure enhanced. We need to get back to schools run for the students.

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amfo72Feb. 3, 1210:10 AM

This is all just PR, it is already being done! The placement process already takes into account factors such as family income level, race, location, etc. There are actually some very good schools poorer areas, and residents of that area get preference. Our 1st and 2nd choices were for such schools, but we ended up getting our 3rd choice, which is the furthest away.

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stpaul2010Feb. 3, 12 4:13 PM

The sad fact is that policies like this are just going to increase flight of middle class families from the city and district. In so many cities in this country, as soon as a family has children of school age, they move to the suburbs or else put their children into private school. One great thing about St Paul is that is still has a number of high-performing public schools, especially elementary, which server their local community. This is just going to erode that further, I am afraid, and make more families choose to bail on the city if they are not in a position to afford private school. A child doing poorly in school actually gives them a better chance at going there-do you think that will improve things? Does the whole city have to fall to the lowest common denominator?

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