Let's give our job creators the help they need

  • Article by: GEOFF MICHEL and TED LILLIE
  • Updated: December 12, 2011 - 8:22 PM

The best thing state government could do is to get out of the way.

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sawmanDec. 12, 11 8:49 PM

Ok, guys. I've got it. Loud and clear. I'm typing this with the help of all ten of my fingers which I still have after 25 years of running various saws with OSHA approved guarding. I can still hear you due to OSHA mandated hearing protection. Those who did my job before OSHA were not as fortunate.

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hookshotDec. 12, 11 8:50 PM

I have ownership interest in 3 businesses. I guess that makes me a job creator. My opinion is the opposite of this article. Our regulations are not particularly burdensome, compared to any other state. The biggest issue start-ups here face is lack of access to capital. Banks are not lending, even for what I would call lower risk opportunities. Mark Dayton established a $100 million fund recently for this purpose. Let's hope it works. The number one reason I see businesses leaving Minnesota is they need access to capital, and its easier to get it elsewhere.

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drichmnDec. 12, 11 9:54 PM

yes, let's give our job creators the help they need. The middle class is the engine of job creation because demand creates jobs. Eliminating business property taxes will only increase middle class property taxes and that will stifle the economy.

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unabashedDec. 12, 1110:08 PM

Completely lame. "Yes, along with local government units, the state actually imposes an additional property tax on job providers." Who also use the courts, police, streets, snow plowing, education system, fire departments, etc. Unlike other users of these services, businesses should get a free ride.

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crystalbayDec. 12, 1110:09 PM

Another typical right wing non-solution. Regulations and taxes are NOT what's harming the economy. Banks & big businesses are sitting on trillions of dollars - there are record profits amassing - yet the so-called job creators are laying off thousands of workers. Plutocracy is winning; democracy is losing. Such simple-mindedness is crippling our society. I know many business owners - including two of my own children - and not one of them complains about regulations or "uncertainty" standing in the way of hiring. It's about DEMAND, and as long as the middle class is struggling from decades-long flattened wages, they don't have the money to increase demand.

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actualreaderDec. 12, 1110:26 PM

Absolutely. It's my personal responsibility as a property taxpayer (minus the homestead credit -- thanks, Republicans) to have had the foresight 18 years ago to see a state in which I have to cover the property taxes on the malls in my city. After all, these noble visionaries and job creators are in it for a profit and I'm just trying to keep a roof over my head. How dare I complain when they try to offload their environmental, safety and even property-tax costs on me?

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farcicalDec. 12, 1111:14 PM

What is more pathetic? The letter, the writers, or people who believe this drivel? Corporations and banks are sitting on $5.3 TRILLION in reserves right now. Why? Because they are holding out hope for more tax breaks and holidays. Simply say, "NO MORE!" and they will loosen up the purse strings. Oh, and enough with the "Job Creators" terminology - call 'em what they are - the uber wealthy.

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pdxtranDec. 12, 1111:58 PM

There's a certain subset of business owners who are pure, shameless greedheads. If they weren't regulated, there's no telling what they would do...and have done in other states and countries: chaining fire doors shut, making employees work with hazardous substances without protective gear, using impure or harmful ingredients in food (several such scandals in China), or having inadequate fire extinguishing equipment or fire drill procedures (as in the recent fatal hospital fire in India). And as others have said, it's not fair to exempt businesses from property taxes and force homeowners to make up the difference.

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mcjoe1Dec. 13, 1112:25 AM

Nonsense. I'm sure your tour involved only businesses that funded GOP campaigns in the past several years. Reduce/abolish the commercial property tax? That's one of the main reasons everyone's property tax has shot through the roof. Job creators need to inspire the market in whatever service or good they're trying to sell. Trimming numbers off their books doesn't create long term growth. It's just a short term financial trick to give them more short term profits. Increased demand for services/products must come first before the unemployment problem can be solved. I don't know any employee that wants to hire since the American consumer is at a spending low.

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mavericksmomDec. 13, 11 2:27 AM

This "job creator" euphemism just makes me gag. It is a blatant falsehood that the super-rich are using to fool the idiots. The economic FACTS belie such comparisons of them being "job creators" The percentage of personal income Minnesotans spend on state and local government: 1991 - 18 percent 2001 - 15.5 percent 2011 - 15.2 percent In addition, pay rates for these super-rich are simply devastating: 1965: production worker (average) $19.61 per hour 2007: production worker (average) $19.71 per hour 1965: CEO pay (hourly basis for comparative purposes) $490.31 2007: CEO pay (hourly basis for comparative purposes) $5,419.97

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