State OKs care jobs for former criminals

  • Article by: BRAD SCHRADE and GLENN HOWATT , Staff Tribune staff writers
  • Updated: December 12, 2011 - 1:57 PM

Two agencies granted thousands of exemptions to people convicted of disqualifying offenses, allowing them to work with state's most vulnerable people.

  • 27
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
swaneeeDec. 11, 11 6:40 AM

So... Abuse a child, steal identities, forge checks, beat a woman etc can not be on the 'radar' but fail to pay your phone bill and instantly you get no phone anywhere in the USA? Why not let one of the phone carriers monitor who did what where and when? They do it quite well.

21
6
bppd46Dec. 11, 11 7:07 AM

That is why my dieing father with alzheimers has his wedding ring taken from his hand while in nursing home care.

25
7
aurorasDec. 11, 11 7:20 AM

Would anyone want their parent's under a criminals care?

22
9
jackpinesavDec. 11, 11 7:49 AM

Not so simple. Few people will take these low paying jobs; most people who commit crimes return to the community and need to work to survive. Yes there must be safeguards; how to do that is the key issue.Oh...and most readers would not work in a care facility with the physical work and low pay.

28
16
davehougDec. 11, 11 8:44 AM

State regulators said they don't know how many of those ex-criminals actually went to work in nursing homes and other facilities because they don't track that information. They also don't follow how many of those individuals subsequently harmed their vulnerable clients or committed additional crimes. - - NOT looking for problems. Remember that the next time you hear of "wasteful administrative overhead". How many calls have there been for more overhead, yet it IS a value to the people of MN.

19
3
larskiofDec. 11, 11 8:47 AM

Take care of your own parent's. Then this shouldn't happen. Oh, that's right you got money and your lazy or got to much to do. Mostly just to selfish?????

5
34
threed61Dec. 11, 11 9:19 AM

Some employers won't hire people who've gone bankrupt, because if they couldn't manage their own money they might steal mine. Imagine you get a serious illness or lose your job in these times. First you lose your life savings, then you're home. What a kick in the teeth to be told its all your fault, you're not trustworthy. A senile neighbor couldn't get home health aid because she would accuse the aides of stealing whenever she couldn't remember where she left something. Her daughter always found the missing items, but the aides got tired of the accusations. A lot of reports about abuse aren't substantiated because they're not true.

16
4
mn00333Dec. 11, 11 9:21 AM

National crime rate statistics show and average of about 3.5% of the population has commited a felony. In economically disadvantaged areas this can rise to over 15%. Given that, it seems reasonable to assume theat every profession, from the guy working at the fast food place, to members of congress and house of representitives will relfelct those numbers. The higher paying the job, the less likely it is to appear. People with money, do not get convicted at anywhere near the same rate as poor and if convicted are much more likely to have a conviction reduced or even expunged. The jobs in nursing homes pay very little, have high turnover, and the nursing homes themselves can't be bothered with doing anymore than complying with the minimal state requirements (if they even do that). And they fight those tooth and nail. They complain that "big government" is regulating them out of work and force high costs while they rake in record profits. Don not be fooled. This is the almighty dollar at work. And it's your dollars, Minnesota. The regulators (as Mr. Schrade noted) are hamstrung by laws and rules requiring them to make allowances for past criminal behavior, then thier budgets are cut regularly (even shutdown last year) to make them more "efficient". Should Minnesota add FBI checks to the mix? How much will that cost per worker? Should regulators put more time into investigating "set asides and variances" for past criminal activity? Where the money going to come for that? It's a matter of fact that we have crimanl activity in this country. From Car theft to people like Blago peddling Obama's senate seat. We cannot put them out on an island or keeps them in lock up; that's way to expensive. Don't take the myopic view of pointing to the closest governemnt official and shouting "shame on you". Ask for more and then, be willing to pay for it.

13
2
abyz4321Dec. 11, 1110:15 AM

Why can't the state shift dollars away from the elimination of state funded tourism promotions, savings of going to a unicameral legistlature, taking 20 percent of wages from state employes making over $100,000 a year, shift Legacy money(after all our senior citizens are a great legacy), etc. and moving this money into an increase in wages for nursing home employees doing the grunt work.

6
5
kneel23Dec. 11, 1110:17 AM

Yeah this is a tough one. Felons and the like occasionally DO turn their ways around and become good hard working citizens, contrary to popular belief. They need jobs like everyone else and it's a well-known issue that ex-criminals have a VERY difficult time finding work, and society WOULD rather have them working and being good tax-paying members of society rather than back on the street doing crime. If we do not let them work or give anyone any chances at all, they WILL most likely end up back on the street doing crime. So its a double-edged sword. The problem is that it is difficult to determine whether they have FULLY changed their ways or not. And if even ONE out of 5000 ex-criminals working at a nursing home (for example) steals something or hurts a patient, it then ruins it for [at least the image of] EVERYONE else who quite possibly bight be doing fine and have changed their ways.

19
2

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT