Expansion-minded tribe has Scott County on edge again

  • Article by: DAVID PETERSON , Star Tribune
  • Updated: December 6, 2011 - 2:43 PM

Its requests to place more land in trust have pitted legal worries against a gradually warming friendship.

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angel123Dec. 6, 11 3:05 PM

I often wonder if the community of Shakopee or other towns surrounding the reservation, or Mystic Lake, would have shared any of their monies with the tribe? If they have the money to buy land, let them buy it. Understanding there would be no tax base, but, hey don't millionaires get tax breaks too? Or is the issue that they are Indians, and they need "us" to help control their lives?

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luzhishenDec. 7, 11 1:44 AM

When whites have money and buy native land, that's okay, but when the tribes get some cash...oh, that's injustice.

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moron100Dec. 7, 11 2:08 PM

The fight is over property taxes that would go away if they are to incorporate the land into tribal land. The rest of the community then has to pay for that missing taxes. Roads go to that business and have been expanded. They benefit and should have to pay just like any other business would. Now the people themselves should not have to pay for their tribal land they own. The casino should since it is a major user of county resources.

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MJStordahlDec. 7, 11 2:36 PM

The fight is not simply over property taxes. Each City has a long term plan based on the way land will be used/developed. In many cases, a City will extend infrastructure (ie. sanitary sewer & watermain) to an area of town with the idea that this chunk of land will pay for these improvements when it develops. Because of the logistics of these types of projects, it's not always possible to wait for land use to be certain. The rub is when the tribe comes in and buys the land only to change it to tribal lands and land that will never develop. The City now has no way to recoup their investment after doing nothing wrong.

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TomacltdDec. 7, 11 2:44 PM

"The tribe disagrees. It points out that the board chose not to intervene in 2009," This is not exactly true. The battle went on for several years before the local governments relented. The cost of the ongoing struggle plus the growing dissension between the communities was high. The current law suggests this application not be approved. If the tribe wants to be part of the local community then they should be just that. If not, then a sovereign nation would normally require customs points of entry. Sorry - we can't go back 250 years and change the past and must live in the future.

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akmscottDec. 7, 1110:21 PM

As far as I'm concerned, if they choose a casino, they then should lose all their other freebies!Enough is enough and everyone is growing tired of the whining and poor us special treatment!

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