Wieffering: The best plan to boost jobs: Invest in workers

  • Article by: ERIC WIEFFERING , Star Tribune
  • Updated: October 25, 2011 - 9:09 PM
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  • Comments

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bloominsmithOct. 25, 1111:17 PM

Stop letting rich East Coast guys trade Oil commodities - we would get gas down to $2.00 again, It's ALL ABOUT gas prices, you idiots.

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danneskjold1Oct. 26, 11 8:10 AM

"The best plan to boost jobs: Invest in workers" might be a popular thing to say, but is backwards, like pushing a wet noodle accros a table. The best plan: invest in ideas, technologies and new business development. The jobs will follow. Jobs ALWAYS follow.

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sarahanneOct. 26, 11 8:50 AM

"Minnesota's unemployment rate was under 5 percent for 10 years ending in 2003". And when did Pawlenty come into office 2003. So just how much good did he do for the Minnesota economy?

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jayzee101Oct. 26, 11 9:27 AM

Why don't you pick up the phone and call an honest person at Delta and ask them why they paid off the MAC to get out of their agreement, and out of the requirement to hold jobs in MN? The honest answer is because doing business in our state has become to expensive, has too much government involvement through restrictions and it's become increasingly difficult to attract good talent here in the state of 10,000 taxes where the cost of living has sky rocketed. The weather stinks too.

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virusdotexeOct. 26, 1110:21 AM

We are between a rock and a hard place. Employers expect to find people with a specific list of skills willing to accept a certain wage. It seems employers are unwilling to deviate in any way from their specific requirements. On the other hand, workers expect to find a certain type of job that pays a certain wage. Many workers also seem unwilling to compromise with respect to their requirements. Who wants it more, the worker looking for the job or the company looking for the worker? Somebody or everybody is going to have to make a compromise at some point.

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swmnguyOct. 26, 1111:54 AM

Margaret Kelliher is wrong. Kris Jacobs is right. We don't need more of us to spend tens of thousands of dollars to get degrees because employers use HR parasites to tell them a receptionist needs a 4 year degree. And for employers to offer wages that give no chance to pay off that educational debt while paying ever-increasing living expenses, and then complain that there aren't any wages, is outrageous. There's no worker shortage. Business is just engaged in a race to the bottom to depress wages. Guess what. They've gotten what they wanted. They've hit bottom. Now they're going to actually have to pay what the market demands, or they won't be able to hire anybody to do the work that makes them money.

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mn_cameraOct. 26, 11 1:15 PM

@ jayzee101: Just like you, I'm sure the thought of a private company like Delta wanting to consolidate office/administrative operations at its national headquarters never entered into the equation.

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kenw1952wOct. 26, 11 6:57 PM

1) Stop the trading of oil commodities 2)Remove tax credits for companies that ship jobs out of the country 3)New tax credits tied to job creation/ new hires within U.S. 4)Establish limits on fees and interest rates banks and other creditors can charge. 5)Increase tax rate on corporate profits from outside investments 6) Lower tax rate on corporate profits from from their own production and services.

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leg620Oct. 26, 11 8:12 PM

3M is slowly moving to Texas. Ford isn't going out of business but they're closing their plant in St. Paul, Marvin Windows swears they'll never build another plant in Minnesota, Delta's leaving. Yeah, couldn't be any truth to the story that the anti-business climate in Minnesota has anything to do with it. It has to be insufficient funding for education.

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CGrothausOct. 27, 11 8:24 AM

An educated workforce is always part of the equation for a successful business climate, but it's not the ONLY success factor. Medtronic, 3M and General Mills are multi-national companies and the growth for these global organizations isn't happening in the U.S. - it's happening in China, India and other parts of the world. So why would they hire more people in Minnesota to support a business that demands they have appropriate staffing in foreign countries? Even as these global companies grow, they won't be growing their employment numbers in Minnesota. The state is lucky to have them based here and employing thousands of people as it is, so stop using our Fortune 500 companies as the poster child for what not to do. Let's help small and medium-size businesses develop and grow - and provide them with a highly skilled workforce to become the next 3M.

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