Fluid changes after 'break-in' period can still be worthwhile

  • Article by: PAUL BRAND
  • Updated: September 16, 2011 - 3:45 PM

Q Back in the 1980s I read in an automotive magazine that to help ensure longevity for your new car, you should change all the driveline fluids early, to remove all the metal shavings. I have had the dealer change the engine oil, differential oil and transmission oil on my last three new vehicles at 1,500 miles. Although, when I bought my last new vehicle in 2003, the dealer really gave me a difficult time, saying that there are no longer break-in fluids.

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smarterthanuSep. 16, 11 7:05 PM

"still a very nice truck"???? Sounds like it's been a lemon!

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enonormanSep. 19, 11 8:38 AM

It surprises me that an individual who allegedly makes his living from the automobile industry would make recommendations contrary to the manufacture. I remember break in periods of slow driving, non detergent oil, and 1,000 mile first service interval 3,000 normal service and twice a year tune ups and 10,000 mile tires and 30,000 valve jobs. But included were 90 day new car warranties and low quality assembly practices. The check up, prior to expiration of the warranty was a common practice. ////////////////// Believe it or not Paul, things have changed a little. Have you ever heard of plateau honing, and hot run engines???? How about full oil filtration and full oil pressure oil, oil and lubricants that have been greatly improved. In 30 years as a field service engineer for a major automotive manufacture I never saw engine failure due to manufacture debris, but thousands of instances of improper service causing failure. You promote synthetic oil, which I also agree will give you the best possible lubrication, but must meet manufactures specifications and still be changed at the recommended service intervals. Have you ever seen the sludging which will occur when you change from petroleum base to synthetic and back again without proper flushing with compatible solvent??? How about sludging as a result of improper, long time and extended miles, service intervals for the oil changes. How about friction plate separation when improper transmission fluid is used. If manufactures can use the same fluid in all transmissions, why would manufactures have strict specifications, it would be cheaper to use a generic fluid. As for axle lubricant, rockwell had failures due to the breakdown of synthetic fluid and the inability of the fluid to withstand the high gear to gear pressure. This resulted in flaking of the hardened surface of the R&P which then destroyed the carrier and pinion bearings and depending on the design, axle and axle bearing failures. When I see a (Paul Brand) as an insignia or Logo as the manufacture who stands behind the product manufactured, I will accept your advice, until then, I will depend on the people who pay the bill if there is a failure.

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