Stress overdose for doctors

  • Article by: JACKIE CROSBY , Star Tribune
  • Updated: September 6, 2011 - 9:53 PM

A new report from the Mayo Clinic suggests that the pressures on medical residents might affect patient care.

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elguevon1Sep. 6, 1110:23 PM

Really??? It took a study to tell the obvious? 12 years of schooling, 80 hour work weeks, and $200k+ in debt....safe to say Mayo could have saved itself some time and money by just using common sense. No need to over analyze everything!

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eastsider45Sep. 7, 11 6:21 AM

My long time doctor just retired because of all the stress and pressure they keep stacking on. He is only around 60 and at the top of his game but the system pretty much forced him out. Most doctors are not in the profession for the money, it's a passion and when the system takes away that passion and replaces it with drudgery you see people walking away. They need some common sense people in the medical field leadership.

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taxpayer17Sep. 7, 11 7:08 AM

Don't forget the constant press coverage that they are part of the "Greedy Rich" that the liberals, including Obama and Dayton are targeting for not paying their "fair share". Can't help a doctor's stress level knowing all that work means they are suppose to pay higher taxes to support more and more programs for the people who don't want to work hard and get a job.

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goferfanzSep. 7, 11 7:34 AM

"They need some common sense people in the medical field leadership."................Agreed, but unfortunately in MN the 1990's witnessed the herding of doctors into these several massive healthcare organizations. Now, the doctors have little say in the day to day decisionmaking, RVU's have supplanted $$$ as a production measure, and there are few good employment options for doctors. Similarly, the healt hmeasures for diabetes, heart dz, etc have made the sickest patients an unwanted commodity in doctor's practices because they make the doctor's "numbers" look bad. The next decade will be fascinating, and chaos could be just around the corner MN's delivery system.......especially if doctor pay moves to P4P based upon healthcare "numbers" for their patients. What doctor would then want an uncontrolled diabetic or heart patient, especially when 200k in debt?

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framptonSep. 7, 11 7:42 AM

When Sebalius cuts the reimbursement of 500 Billion dollars to the Hospitals and Doctors as they promised and then Obama raises the taxes on the new Doctors so they have a hard time paying back the huge debt they start out with..then you'll see some stress.

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smittyjsSep. 7, 11 8:49 AM

Wow, I wonder how much the NIH paid for that study? This "tough love" approach has been part of the "old boys" methods for years, not any better today than in the past. I can tell you that it's true at Mayo because I've been a patient there all of my life. You never want to have to visit the ER at Mayo in July when all the new residents are just coming up to speed. Scary is one word but dangerous is more accurate. But let's face it, it's all about the money. Even though Mayo is "non-profit" last year they were plus $600 million.

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ELYMANSep. 7, 11 9:15 AM

Duh! Let's see, residents running dozens of hours in a row. No problem! Airline pilots and truckers have hour limitations, as do railway workers. But not doctors? Its always been absolutely stupid.

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iowasenseSep. 7, 11 9:31 AM

The result of limiting 1st year residents to 16hrs consecutive has increased the hours that 2nd and 3rd year residents must work to provide the same care for the same number of patients. But the real problem to be solved is how to lessen the accumulated debt for those who wish to become doctors. People with $160,000 plus in educational bills often do not want to go into family care at $140,000 when they can specialize and make $200,000 plus.

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remoguySep. 7, 1110:05 AM

And the fact that the Obama administration has started requiring residents to pay back their loans further adds to the problem. Try paying off a $200k loan on $45k a year and still provide for your family. Many residents are being forced into arrangements with rural towns where the town pays off the loan and the resident is required to practice in the town after residency. My daughter has several friends who just signed such contracts. Talk about a dream killer.

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iowasenseSep. 7, 1111:05 AM

@remoguy Definitely a dream killer to have to sign a seven year deal usually at a slightly lower salary that pays off your loans in a timely manner. Plus you may have to pay for a license for another state if it is one different from where you are doing your residency. And that can often be another $2000 to $3000 to obtain the license.

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